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Hanover Town Reports
1990-2019

Hanover Annual Report, 1990

  • Howe Library report: In 1900 Emily Howe Hitchcock established the Howe Library Corporation for the purpose of maintaining a public library for the town of Hanover," and her childhood home became the Howe Library. In 1975 the library left that original building (built in 1773 by Eleazar Wheelock, and now known as Wheelock House) and moved to its present location. The new building was designed by the Boston architectural firm of Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbot. Although the basic annual operating budget of the library is now funded by Hanover taxpayers, the building itself was financed by a very successful fund-raising campaign and a loan, which is being repaid almost entirely with income from the Corporation's endowment. Contributions or memorial gifts to the Corporation are gratefully received and are used to enrich the library's collections and services. Photo by Patricia Harden berg The library endowment funds buy special titles which could not be obtained through the regular town budget. In addition, books on tape, music tapes, compact discs, and videos are all purchased with endowment and gift monies. The trustees and staff welcome your interest in the library and your participation in its activities.

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library has been the official library for the Town of Hanover since it was established as the "Hanover Free Library" in 1899. The present building was completed in 1905. At the dedication Mr. Edward P. Starrs, chairman of the Town Selectmen, said "...and here will be found a fitting close to the chain of Libraries of which Hanover can be proud." The library budget is financed by the Hanover Town budget, with supplements drawn from book sales, donations, and the annual "Love My Library" campaign in February. The Hanover Town Library, locally known as the Etna Library, basically serves the Etna community, but it is open to all taxpayers of Hanover. Patricia M. Hardenberg is the librarian. She is the only staff person at the library. Volunteers open the library Thursday evenings and a weekly volunteer helps Thursday mornings. 

Hanover Annual Report, 1991

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library, locally known as the Etna Library, serves the community both as a charming piece of Hanover's history and a ready source of recreational reading. 1,416 patrons used the library in 1991 and 3,200 items were circulated, including books, magazines and books-on-tape. 56 new patrons were registered. Storytime was held every other Thursday at 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Two puppet-making workshops were well-attended and enjoyed by the participants. An origami workshop had the children's area filled to capacity! The Summer Reading Program, a co-operative effort with the Howe and Lebanon Libraries, had 18 readers earn certificates and free ice cream. Evening storytimes were held every Tuesday in August. In addition to the regular budget, new books were purchased with gift funds from February's annual "Love My Library" campaign, the Hanover Garden Club's usual generous donation, and book sales jointly sponsored by the Howe and Etna Libraries. We look forward to continuing our focus on quality children's programs, beginning with the addition of a Toddler Storytime in the Spring. The cataloguing of the library's holdings will be completed in 1992. The Board of Trustees and the librarian offer a special thank you to our Thursday evening volunteers for their help in extending the library's hours each week.

  • Howe Library report: Some major changes occurred at Howe Library in 1991. Here are some highlights: AUTOMATION- After over 2 years of planning and data entry work, Howe Library went online with circulation in mid-October. The new computer software purchased from the Winnebago Company, provides a window to patron activity. We can now keep patrons up to date regarding materials they have on loan, overdues , card expiration dates, and items on reserve. We are now able to tell more easily what materials are on the shelves and available for use. However, we have not yet reached the optimal level of service, as we are working out the bugs and still familiarizing staff and volunteers with procedures. Errors are becoming less and less common, we are happy to report. STAFF HOURS CUTS- Due to cuts in the 1991-92 budget, we had to close the library for 8 hours per week. Hours closed include: 8 to 9 P.M. Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, 6 to 9 P.M. on Thursday, and Friday 10 to Noon. The 1991 statistics reflect less activity in terms of materials circulation, programs, and reference activity. In deciding which services to cut, we made every effort to preserve the most important services (collection, reference, public service hours) . We added a number of new volunteers and increased our volunteer hours by 3.5 per week, for a total of 1,833 hours in 1991. FACILITY RENOVATION PROJECT- The Howe Library Corporation expended over $45,000 to create a new technical services workroom in the closed stacks, and to refurbish the upstairs workroom. The Town Budget provided $1,600 for furnishings for the new spaces. These spaces provided much enhanced working conditions for the staff. In addition, the Elden Murray Room was redecorated and carpeted, thus creating a more comfortable space for public meetings and library conferences. SENIOR CITIZEN OUTREACH- The Library Director worked closely with Kendal Librarian Barbara Brainerd to provide aterials on loan for the Kendal Library, and delivery service to residents who cannot get to Howe Library, due to illness or weather conditions. We look forward to continued cooperation with Kendal, along with our other outreach sites: the Greens, and the Hanover Senior Center in 1992. In July 1992 we will restore 2 public service hours, as Selectpeople appropriated monies for this purpose. During the month of March, we'll be asking for citizen feedback regarding which hours to restore (Thursday evening 6 to 8 , or Friday morning 10 to 12) . The Library Trustees will review this feedback before making a decision regarding reinstated hours. We welcome ideas and suggestions from Hanover citizens and taxpayers regarding our collections, services, and programs.

  • Etna Library budget: $6,905

Hanover Annual Report, 1992

  • Hanover's earliest public library was not located within the downtown village area, as one might now assume, but rather out in "Mill Village" as Etna was then called prior to its present name being officially adopted in 1884. This was more in the geographical center of the community and the location of the all important annual Town Meeting. The first library was established on June 12, 1801 and apparently had a reasonably large collection of books for that time. During the nineteenth century the library went through several incorporations as well as various locations around the village. Although the outlying rural areas of the town had their literary needs reasonably well tended to by the turn of this century, the downtown village population was still without a public library. Therefore, on February 22, 1900, Emily Howe, forty-seven years old, gave her family home, located at 4 West Wheelock Street, to the Town of Hanover to be used as a public library. This was viewed as an appropriate structure to house a library for the building was originally constructed as the home of Eleazar Wheelock, Dartmouth's first President (see town calendar, month of May) . Some minor restoration and remodeling work was done on the building and the doors opened to the public on April 7, 1900, with about 1,200 books on hand. Emily Howe Hitchcock (she had married her widower cousin Hiram Hitchcock who had earlier in 1890 given the Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital in remembrance of his first wife) passed away on January 16, 1912 but left the library well endowed. A brick addition housing several floors of stacks was built in 1914, and otherwise the facility served the community well for over seventy years until sold by the Library Trustees upon completion of the present facility on East South Street in 1975. Both of these early photographs are of the original Howe Library, shortly after it was opened to the public. The upper view is of the front hall featuring the circulation desk and card catalog. The lower picture shows the comfortable front reading room.

  • HISTORY IN THE MAKING AT HOWE LIBRARY: Mary Churchill and Pegge Strickler, the remaining two Howe librarians who had worked in the old building on West Wheelock Street, retired in 1992. Mary first joined the staff in 1949, directly from Radcliffe. In those days, everyone did a little bit of everything: cataloging books, getting books ready to be on the shelf, circulating books, and putting books back on the shelf. At the time of her retirement, Mary's official title was "Head of Technical Services", and her work was highly specialized. Over 43 years, Mary witnessed a revolution in the scope of library services. Somehow she managed to keep the catalog accurate, keep track of every detail and keep her wonderful sense of humor through it all. Pegge, known for her ability to make people laugh, served as Children's Librarian for more than 20 years. Books and other materials for children reflect the changes in society over that time, but the ability to connect the right story with the right small person is as important now as it was in 1970. Pegge' legacy is a children's collection unmatched in the region. No doubt Pegge' s globe-trotting will accelerate to an even more feverish pace now that she's retired. Her culinary skills will encompass more ethnic regions, and her garden will flourish. The Town of Hanover honors these two special librarians who gave 64 years of outstanding service.

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library, locally known as the Etna Library, basically serves the Etna-Hanover Center community while welcoming patrons from the greater Hanover area. It has been the official library for the Town of Hanover since it was established as the "Hanover Free Library" in 1899. The present building, finished throughout with varnished hazelwood, was completed in 1905. At the dedication Mr. Edward P. Storrs, chairman of the Town Selectmen, said "... and here will be found a fitting close to the chain of Libraries of which Hanover can be proud." Eighteen hundred patrons used the library in 1992 and 3,200 items were circulated, including books, magazines and books-on tape. Sixty new patrons were registered. Storytime for ages 3 to 6 was held every other Thursday throughout the year, and a new series of programs for toddlers, "Tales for 2's and 3's: An Introduction to the Storytime Experience" was begun in the Spring. A puppet making workshop was enjoyed by all; storyteller Becky Graber performed; the Summer Reading Program, a co-operative effort with the Howe and Lebanon Libraries, was successful; and an evening storytime was held Tuesdays in August with local author Clyde Watson reading her stories one evening. An additional card catalog section was purchased to accommodate our expanding collection. The Apple He and its software, generously donated by Howe Library, serves the librarian well and is available to the public. The Board of Trustees and the librarian offer a special thank you to our Thursday evening volunteers for help in extending the library's hours each week. We look forward to continuing our focus on quality children's programs. While the library is a charming piece of Hanover's history, it is also a vital and ready source of recreational reading for children and adults.

  • Etna Library budget: $13,150; Howe Library budget: $378,986

Hanover Annual Report, 1993

  • Howe Library report: The Public Services Division: Circulated 194,000 books, magazines, cassette tapes, CD's, videos, art prints, puzzles and pamphlets * Answered 7,899 reference questions * Processed 5,137 reserves * Held 122 programs * Handled 1,957 inter-library loan transactions * Sent about 70 overdue notices and bills per week * Selected $60,150 worth of new circulating and reference materials * Discarded about 2,000 old books and audio-visual materials / The Technical Services Division: * Placed orders for about 3,000 new circulating and reference materials * Added about 3,000 new listings to the computer database and the card catalog * Eliminated about 2,000 records from the computer database and the card catalog * Prepared thousands of new books, magazines, tapes, CD's, videos, art prints and puzzles for circulation / The Administration Division: * Planned and supervised the rearrangement of all shelving on the main floor to create optimum use of space * Planned and implemented a new organizational structure based upon the team style of management * Prepared budgets for Town and Corporation appropriations and managed expenditures * Scheduled 698 meetings in the Mayer and Murray rooms* Collected and accounted for $13,837 in fines, $31,844in non-resident fees, and $571 from the coin copier66 Maintained 6,892 patron registration files Managed scheduling for 27 paid workers and 32 volunteers

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library, locally known as the Etna Library, assumes a special obligation to the children of the Etna-Hanover Center community and welcomes those from the greater Hanover areas as well. Once again this year, Storytime for preschoolers was offered every other week. The "Tales for 2's and 3's" program was developed especially for toddlers as an introduction to storytime. These six-week sessions, held three times a year, have proven to be popular and fun! School -age children have enjoyed storytellers, puppet-making workshops and other crafts programs, in addition to the annual Summer Reading Program. Adults, too, have been well-served at the Etna Library. Best sellers and popular non-fiction have often been available with no waiting list. The audio books section, including popular and classic titles, continues to grow. The librarian completed a course in "Reference and Information Services," focusing in particular on the future of reference service at the Hanover Town Library. The tangible result: a current, basic collection of ready-reference resources has been established and is available for patrons' use. Nearly 1,800 patrons used the library; 3,285 items, including books, magazines, and books -on-tape, were circulated ;and 49 new library cards, many representing families, were issued this fiscal year. The Board of Trustees and the librarian particularly wish to thank our loyal Thursday evening volunteers for their help in extending the library's hours each week.

  • Etna Library budget: $13,256; Howe Library budget: $351,916

Hanover Annual Report, 1994

  • Howe Library report: We strengthened and streamlined our team management style of organization . We concentrated on short range goals: * To research and select a new automated, integrated system for implementation in the summer of 1995; unanimous approval given by the Hanover Selectmen and Howe Corporation Trustees * To initiate a cooperative effort among students, parents, teachers, administrators and library staff to address the after-school situation by providing a welcome atmosphere for all patrons * To study the issue of non-resident fees and submit recommendations to the Selectmen for their decision Toward our goal of ever- improving public service, Howe Library: * Circulated 192,000 items * Answered 8,929 reference questions * Processed 4,605 reserves * Held 197 library sponsored programs including a new Toddler Story Hour; total attendance 3,730 * Handled 1,853 interlibrary loan transactions * Selected $63,000 worth of new circulating and reference materials and processed 3,354 new items * Discarded about 2,000 old books and videos and removed the records from the database * Scheduled 841 meetings in the Mayer and Murray rooms * Collected and accounted for $13,914 in fines, $32,285 in non-resident fees and $580 from the coin copier * Maintained 7,822 patron registration fines * Scheduled a staff of 27 paid employees (including an amazing 7 with MLS degrees) and 32 regular volunteers.

  • Etna Library report: Was open an additional two hours each Wednesday beginning July 1 . * served 1,873 patrons from Etna, Hanover Center, and Hanover . * registered 69 new patrons. * circulated 3,377 books, magazines and books-on-tape. * handled 20 inter-library loan transactions. * answered 41 reference questions. * added 352 new circulating materials. * held 73 programs for children, including Storytime every other week; Toddler Storytime for 3 six-week sessions; a puppet-making workshop; a crafts project the Summer Reading Program; a community picnic; and an author visit. * appreciated, as always, the loyalty of its Thursday volunteers, who assist the librarian with many tasks and open the library an additional 104 hours a year beyond what the budget allows.

  • Resolution for the Howe Library: For the past seventeen months, the valiant crew of the Great Ship Howe has been sailing a course with new navigational charts . Entering unknown waters, they have chartered their way with new confidence, new lines of command, and have calmed the raging seas. The voyage has been skippered by Peggy Hyde, with able assistance from her first mates, Polly Gould, Mary Hardy, Mary Soderberg, Vicky Bedi , and Joanne Blais . No vessel can survive the wind-tossed ways without a loyal and skilled crew to mind the lines and keep the sheets trimmed, and the hardy seamen of Charlotte Bernini, Ellen Lynch, Pamela Soren, Ann Mercer, Janice Grady, Joan Ridgeway, Natalie Urmson, Kit Farrell, and Cindy Varnum, did just that. As the crew readies the ship for the arrival of a new Captain, we offer three cheers for the fine job the amazing seamen have done. With the new charts that have been written, we wish Howe smooth sailing on calm seas as it embarks on its voyage into the next century. Let's have three cheers! Hip Hip Hooray! Hip Hip Hooray! Hip Hip Hooray! Moderator Bird introduced Marilyn W. Black for reading of the resolution for former Police Chief, Kurt Schimke.

  • Etna Library now open 16 hours a week.

Hanover Annual Report, 1995

  • Howe Library report: SERVICE: "People Serving People" is the mission of Howe Library each day of each year. Our goal is to maintain our tradition of personal attention while improving service to the public. Our primary accomplishment in 1995 was to maintain the high level of service for which we strive while completing a major automation project. Implementation of the new system went smoothly; patrons were minimally inconvenienced and service was uninterrupted. KNOWHOWE KnowHowe is the name given the online catalog of the collection at Howe. The integrated library automation system, purchased from Innovative Interfaces, Inc. was approved in the Fall of 1994and funded by the Town of Hanover and the Howe Library Corporation. A target date of September 5, 1995 was set to bring the system online - and we met that goal! Intense planning, preparation, and training during the year led to a carefully orchestrated transition from the previous system to the new one which offers many options for online public access: * Catalog of the collection. Patrons may dial-in to KnowHowe (see statistics) Directly (643-0732 or 643-0733) or Via the Internet (telnet to howe.valley.net) * View a patron record (at the Library or home/office) * Renew items * Place a hold for an on-order item or one that is circulating * Circulation function * Magazine index - to over 400 magazines, with abstracts(available by direct dial-in) * Connect to other libraries to view catalogs * Library information * Management tools to assist in analyzing how to better serve the community The Hanover Town Library in Etna, part of this project, has a computer with which to access KnowHowe and will soon be in putting their holdings to form an online catalog to both collections. THE INTERNET: Hanover Homepage Howe Library has been developing and expanding the Hanover Homepage which can be accessed on the Internet at http://www.valley.net:80/-hanover/ To date viewers may find information about all Town departments, schedules of meetings and events, latest important and emergency information, and many links to other homepages such as the Hanover Area Chamber of Commerce, Dartmouth College, vital records, and the Appalachian Trail. Public Access Funded by a grant from the New Hampshire State Library matched by the Howe Corporation, a computer and printer are available for public access to the Internet. Howe offers reservations for time online and training -to facilitate using the Internet for educational and informational purposes.

  • Etna Library report: The Etna Library strives to provide materials, programs, and services that meet the recreational and information interests of the community and complement other local library resources. In 1995 the library: * acquired a computer system which provides access to "KnowHowe" and will, in the near future, present Etna's collection on-line as well. * served 2,068 patrons and welcomed 37 new patrons. * circulated 3,661 books, magazines and books-on-tape * added 407 circulating items. * provided Inter-Library Loan and Reference service. * held 67 library sponsored programs for children, including Storytime for ages 3 to 6; Toddler Storytime 18 weeks of the year; a puppet show; two puppet-making workshops; and the annual Summer Reading Program. Total number of people participating: 836. * held its annual Community Picnic and Book Sale in June and Love My Library Month in February. * appreciated, as always, the loyalty of its Thursday volunteers.

  • Etna Library budget: $16,152; Howe Library budget: $403,904

Hanover Annual Report, 1996

  • Article Eighteen: To see if the Town will vote to adopt the provisions of RSA 202-A:4-d authorizing the library trustees to accept gifts of personal property, other than money, which may be offered to the library for any public purpose, provided, however, that no acceptance of personal property by the library trustees shall be deemed to bind the Town or the library trustees to raise, appropriate or expend any public funds for the operation, maintenance, repair or replacement of such personal property. And further, to require that prior to the acceptance of any such gift, valued at over $5,000, the public library trustees shall hold a public hearing on the proposed acceptance.

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library, locally known as the Etna Library, has been serving the surrounding community since 1906 . Ninety years later this one-room, rural library is a vital, technologically up-to-date institution housed in one of Hanover's most historic and beautiful buildings. The Etna Library strives to provide materials, programs and services that meet the recreational interests and informational needs of the community, and to complement other local library resources. Of note. . . * The library's collection is now online with Howe Library's holdings via KnowHowe . Patrons can view the online catalog by using our public access computer. * Circulation is automated. Patrons are being issued new "Libraries of Hanover, NH" library cards which can be used at both the Etna and Howe Libraries. * The library provides Inter-Library Loan and basic reference service . * Storytime for pre-schoolers and introductory storytimes for toddlers are held throughout the year. Special programs for school-age children include the Summer Reading Program, puppet shows, storytellers and craft workshops. * The community enjoys the annual Picnic & Book Sale in June and generously supports Love My Library Month with donations of new books each February. * Volunteers have rallied to support opening the library on Saturdays-Thanks ! * The library is open 2 hours each week: Monday & Wednesday 2-7 Thursday & Friday 10-2 Saturday 10-12.

  • Howe Library report: After almost two years of study, the Long Range Plan was completed in 1996. It was unanimously adopted by the Trustees and Selectmen. The mission outlines the Library's purpose and is fulfilled through the selected roles: As a vital Hanover institution, Howe Library brings together people, ideas, and information. We encourage everyone to read and to enjoy the resources we offer. We will fulfill out mission by: * Providing materials responsive to users' interests. * Delivering comprehensive reference and information services.* Serving children and parents to encourage their interest in reading and learning. * Supporting schools and independent learning. * Promoting area library cooperation and resource sharing. The Long Range Plan identified three main strategies to achieve the mission. * Building the collection at an approximate rate of 2% annually over 10-15 years, beginning in the year 2000. * Developing a Master Plan to examine the costs and benefits of remodeling the present facility, building an addition for future growth, and parking for all options. * Encouraging the development of cooperative networks among the libraries in Hanover. Another recommendation was to study the feasibility of a major celebration to mark the Library's 100th anniversary in the year 2000, This committee as well as the Master Plan Committee and the Networking Committee began work late in 1996. Libraries of Hanover Card: 1996 was devoted to the implementation of all facts of the new automated system and to bringing the Etna Library online with its collection to form a Libraries of Hanover union catalog. One library card for all residents and fee payers was introduced to provide service at both libraries. The Internet and Howe Library Website (http : //www. valley .net/ -hanover/howe) : Howe's homepage has evolved over the last two years and is expanding regularly to include "hot links" (direct connections)to other website that contain interesting and needed resources. The importance of the website has become a main direction for Howe in fulfilling our roles. Internet training sessions from basic to advanced search engine strategies continue to be requested and scheduled. Volunteer trainers are available for individual training sessions. staffing Enhancements and Changes: The 1996-97 budget approved the addition of 4.5 hours to provide the equivalent of a full time Children's Librarian. The change means more programming and more hours that a professional is available to help in the Children's Room. Mary Ryan joined Joanne Blais to complete the position. Ellen Lynch was promoted to Coordinator of Public Services changing positions with Polly Gould, who requested fewer hours as the Reference Librarian. We welcomed Kris Burnett as a substitute, primarily on Sundays. Statistics Holdings: 70,337 Circulation: 203,325 Registered patrons: 6,778 Days open: 33 9 Reference questions handled: 8,915 Holds placed: 6,409 Interlibrary loan transactions: 2,479 Library sponsored programs: 246 Attendance: 7,084 Public meeting room usage: 790 meetings (plus library sponsored = 1,03 6) Volunteer hours: 2,683 Number of staff: 11.5 full time equivalents Opac (online public access computers) searches: 16 /day average

  • Etna Library now open 20 hours a week.

  • Etna Library budget: $20,411; Howe Library budget: $442,273

Hanover Annual Report, 1997

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library, locally known as the Etna Library, was named to the National Register of Historic Places in April of 1997. Our mission is to provide materials, programs and services that meet the recreational interests and informational needs of the community, complementing other local library resources. Statistics (1997): Circulation: 5103 items • Patrons served: Adults - 1422 Children - 1143 • Library sponsored programs: 60 Of note... • Circulation has increased by 32% and patron use is up 23% over last year. Our on-line catalog and automated circulation system have made us more visible and accessible to the larger Hanover community. • The library provides Inter-Library Loan and basic reference service. • Unabridged books-on-tape and videos are now available as rotating collections, changing several times a year. • Storytime for preschoolers and introductory storytimes for toddlers are held throughout the year. Special programs for school-age children include the Summer Reading Program, puppet shows, storytellers, and craft workshops. Thank you to our loyal volunteers who began staffing Saturday hours in February 1997. With their help, the library is open 86 extra hours a year. • The library is open 20 hours each week: Monday & Wednesday 2-7 Thursday & Friday 10-2 Saturday 10-12 (September thru May) Closed Tuesdays and Sundays

  • Howe Library Report: Progress was made on the three strategies outlined in the Long Range Plan, 1996. The strategy of building the collection at an approximate rate of 2% annually over 10-15 years is dependent on the strategy of developing a Master Plan to examine the costs and benefits of remodeling the present facility, building an addition for future growth, and parking for all options. The Master Plan Committee hired consultants and presented the final Master Facility Plan to the Selectmen and Trustees in May, 1997. This Plan documents the space needs based on the services and programs residents support and demand. The existing building was built in 1975 with a growth potential for 15 years and a stated capacity of 70,000 items. Today the collection exceeds that number by over 3,000 items, many of which must be in storage. Furthermore, new services requiring space have been added during that time. Both the Selectmen and the Trustees are continuing to discuss these needs and options to develop the best plan for Howe Library. Make a note to visit http://www.thehowe.org - for around the clock access to: • A vast periodical index by EBSCO where you can search for articles indexed in over 1500 magazines and newspapers, many with full text. In additional to general information, specialized indexes are available for business and health; • Howe's online catalog of its collection, KnowHowe, where you can place holds on items you want, see what you have out and when items are due, renew, and much more; • A list of recent acquisitions with annotations for fiction titles; • ValleyNet's new Community Calendar, your one-stop source for happenings in the Upper Valley; • Great Internet sites for kids, teens, readers, everyone! Two new services introduced in 1997 were the Rental Collection and Circulating CD ROM Collections for adults and children. The purposes of the Rental Collection are to provide extra copies of popular items and to shorten the queues on the regular circulating items. A donation of seed money established funding for the collection, which is sustained by the revenues it generates. The circulating CD ROMs are in response to requests by patrons and the high turnover rate indicates this is an area to continue expanding in 1998. After 22 years of service, Mary Soderberg retired as Supervisor of the Circulation Department. Fortunately, Howe will continue to have her expertise and bright smile to greet patrons as she continues as a substitute with reduced hours. Her successor as Supervisor is Kristina Burnett who has been working Sundays at Howe while completing her Master of Library Science Degree. Other additions to the staff include: Dick Murphy, after school Monitor, and Jan Chapman, Circulation Assistant.

  • ARTICLE EIGHTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to adopt the provisions of RSA 202-A:4-d authorizing the library trustees to accept gifts of personal property, other than money, which may be offered to the library for any public purpose, provided, however, that no acceptance of personal property by the library trustees shall be deemed to bind the Town or the library trustees to raise, appropriate or expend any public funds for the operation, maintenance, repair or replacement of such personal property. And further, to require that prior to the acceptance of any such gift, valued at over $5,000,the public library trustees shall hold a public hearing on the proposed acceptance. Selectman Walsh made the motion that the Town vote to adopt the provisions of RSA 202-A:4-d which authorizes the library trustees to accept gifts of personal property, other than money, which may be offered to the library for any public purpose, provided that no acceptance of personal property by the library trustees shall be deemed to bind the Town or the library trustees to raise, appropriate or expend any public funds for the operation, maintenance, repair or replacement of such personal property; and further, to require that prior to the acceptance of any such gift, valued at over $5,000, the public library trustees shall hold a public hearing on the proposed acceptance. The motion was seconded. Bill Baschnagle noted that the Howe Library trustees are trustees of a private corporation, and asked if the Town could pass a resolution that influences or dictates what they can or cannot do with regards to gifts to the corporation. Ms. Griffin answered that she has asked the Town attorney for additional feedback on this issue. There being no further discussion, a voice vote was taken and found to be in the affirmative. The motion PASSED and Article 18 was ADOPTED.

Hanover Annual Report, 1998

  • ARTICLE TWENTY-NINE: (Article by Petition) To see if the Town will vote to designate and proclaim April 7, 2000 as Howe Library Day in celebration of the library's 100 birthday, and to observe a series of related public activities that will promote citizens' awareness of their library.

  • Next year not only brings us to the millenium, but also the One-Hundredth Birthday of Howe Library. Howe Library Trustees are already well along in planning a series of events designed to celebrate this wonderful community resource. There will be several special events, offering something for everyone.

  • Etna Library report: With a circulation increase of 14% and patron use up by 9% in 1998, the Hanover Town Library continues to be an active presence in the villages of Etna and Hanover Center, and in the larger community. Locally known as the "Etna Library," we strive to provide our services in a personal manner, maintain an up-to-date and eclectic collection of materials for children and adults, and preserve the library's historic building. Statistics (1998) ; Circulation: 5821 items Patrons served: Adults - 1675 Young adults and Children - 1 122 • Holds filled: 404 Inter-Library loans filled: 55 What you will find... Bestsellers, current and classic fiction, children's literature, non-fiction, and magazines. A rotating collection of unabridged books-on-tape as well as our own permanent collection of audiobooks. A rotating collection of videos, including, for example, PBS series and classic films. Inter-Library Loan and basic reference service. Storytime for toddlers and preschoolers; programs for school-age children KnowHowe, the Howe and Etna Library's on-line database of our holdings. Volunteers who cheerfully staff the library every Saturday, year 'round. The library is open 20 hours each week: Monday & Wednesday 2-7 Thursday & Friday 10-2 Saturday 10-12 Closed Tuesdays and Sundays

  • Howe Library report: You were busy using Howe Library during 1998 - please check the statistics that follow to better understand how active your public library was and is. The staff, with Town and Corporation support, continues to work hard to meet the demands and interests of residents. A record number of volunteers, including committee members, whose efforts and gift of valuable time help us to serve you better, aided us in countless ways. Personnel: We, staff and community, bade goodbye to Children's Librarian, Joanne Blais, and welcomed as a full time Children's Librarian, Denise Reitsma. Patti Hardenberg joined the Howe staff part time when Pamela Smith began work on her Master of Library Science degree. Program: Howe was pleased to offer a unique new pre-school children's program based on research reporting that when a child is read to for approximately 1,000 hours, the child has a better opportunity of becoming a life-time reader and will be better prepared for school. The program affords the opportunity to read 1,000 different books, selected to provide a variety of reading options. The program was such a hit that the colorful bags, each holding 10 books, are never to be found on the bag rack. To meet this extraordinary demand, we arranged to duplicate the entire program in 1999. Improvements: Improvements were made to our popular new materials lists which can be accessed in two formats: print and on our Website. Cooperation with ValleyNet expanded the number of co-sponsored workshops. The school/public librarians continued cooperative efforts on many levels. Howe received a Library Services & Technology Act grant from the New Hampshire State Library which, matched by funds from the Howe Corporation, will fund WebPac, an easier way to search our collection via the Internet. During the year the number of full text magazines available through Ebsco online increased dramatically at no extra charge. Our book discussions and Millennium series continue to attract interest and receive high ratings from those who attend. Progress: The recommendation from the Master Facility Plan Committee and Trustees to expand Howe from 14,000 sq. ft. to 23,300 sq. ft. was put on hold to enable Howe the opportunity to participate in the Joint Public Facilities Committee with other area institutions: Dresden Schools, Hanover and Norwich Selectboards, Dartmouth College, and the Community Center Task Force. In the meantime the Howe Library Centennial Celebration Committee began planning a series of gala festivities to culminate in April 2000, the 100th anniversary of Howe Library. The Development Planning Committee hired a consultant to conduct a feasibility study for an expansion or new library. It has been a busy and productive year.

  • Selectman Walsh noted that the Howe Library Trustees are looking at Howe Library needs and in which direction the Library should grow over time to meet the needs of the 21st century and its second 100 years.

  • "Mary Soderberg retired as Circulation Supervisor at Howe Library last December, but she'll still be accepting your fine money Wednesday mornings. After 22 years on the library staff, Mary decided this year to step down from the demanding job of managing the Circulation Department. Fortunately for everyone who can't imagine Howe without Mary, she'll continue to flash her bright smile across the desk for a few hours each week. Mary is known for her extensive knowledge of books, her wit, her ability to communicate with the mobs of preschoolers who do library business on her watch, and her commitment to the highest standards of public service. Under Mary's leadership, circulation staff were encouraged to convey a calm and helpful demeanor no matter how chaotic the situation. Her favorite reminder was Willem Lange's observation that librarians are like ducks - appearing serene on the surface, but paddling like crazy underneath. Mary's first career as a nursery school teacher worked to the staff's advantage. She applied the qualities of patience, humor, and attention to basics that are so effective with young children in her training of grownups. Her "students" - everyone who has worked at the Circulation Desk in recent years - will carry her lessons with them always. Thank you, Mary, for your many years of exemplary service to the Town of Hanover. It's reassuring to know that your quilting projects, grandparent responsibilities, and community activities won't completely overshadow your ongoing dedication to Howe Library."

Hanover Annual Report, 1999

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library, locally known as the Etna Library, is an active presence in the community, providing materials and programs for children and adults. The library's rural setting, historic building and furnishings, and a tradition of warm, personal service evoke an earlier era. Yet its vibrant, eclectic collection of books, audiobooks, magazines and videos for all ages; online catalog; easy access to Interlibrary Loan and reference service; and automated circulation system all speak of a vital, up-to-date institution. New Librarian: Library patrons welcomed a new Librarian in March 2000. Barbara Prince, a Hanover resident and loyal patron of the Etna Library, replaced Patti Hardenberg, who resigned after eleven years of service to take a new position at the Howe Library. Barbara brings with her a love of the Etna Library as well as five years experience running a small, rural library in Vermont. Long-range plan: A long-range plan was completed in the fall of 1999. Goals include: promoting the library's services; fostering an awareness of the history of the library; ensuring preservation of and safe access to the historic building; and providing adult and children's programming. Statistics: Our statistics show that circulation increased by 22% and patron use by 14% from July of 1998 to December of 1999. While our holdings remain steady and reflect the library's space limitations, other indicators, detailed below, show the library to be well used and growing.

  • Etna Library Trustee report: The Trustees for the Hanover Town Library, locally known as the Etna Library, are elected by Hanover voters to oversee the library. Ongoing Efforts: The Trustees were active in overseeing the development of the library budget, approving purchase of a public access terminal for the library's online catalog, and supporting the Librarian's efforts to provide services and programs. Long-Range Plan: A mission statement and long-range plan for the library were adopted in February 1999. With the Trustees acting as the steering committee, each has been responsible for implementing one of the three goals in the plan. The goals encompass service; programming; and preservation of, and safe access to, the historic library building. Survey Collection: In keeping with the mission statement, which states in part that the Library "will be an active presence in the village," the trustees supported the Guiding Growth in Rural Hanover process by allowing the library to be a survey collection location. Meeting Times: The Trustees meet at 8:30 a.m. the first Friday of each month at the Etna Library. (No meeting in July.) Members: The three members of the Etna Library Board of Trustees include Becky Torrey (Chair); Amy Stephens (Secretary); and John Stebbins (Treasurer).

  • Howe Library report: In striving to fulfill its mission to bring together people, ideas, and information, Howe Library encourages everyone to read and to enjoy the resources we offer. In the year 2000, Howe's Centennial, a record number of residents joined us to mark the occasion. Marilyn Crichlow and her dedicated committee organized a celebration to be long-remembered and cherished. Beginning with a home-town parade in September and ending with a gala dinner featuring the Poet Laureate of the United States, Robert Pinsky, events energized all who treasure Howe Library. The series also included programs held on "Centennial Sundays" (and many weekday evenings), a wide variety of children's programs including several with area authors, and exhibits to accompany events. We look toward continuing our search for excellence in public service and meeting recognized needs in our 2"^* Century in a renovated, expanded Howe Library. The firm of Robert A. M. Stem Architects was hired in 1999 to design a building to meet the requirements of the Master Facility Plan. The result is an exciting, inspiring plan that will be the basis for a dialogue to seek public input. Funds for the expansion will not come from tax dollars, but will be raised privately by the Howe Corporation. To prepare for the magnitude of a capital campaign, the Trustees authorized the first annual giving campaign beginning in April and ending in December, 2000 for the purpose of enhancing programs/services. Program Improvements: • Grant received: The Institute of Museum and Library Services awarded a grant totaling $96,000 to the Montshire Museum and Howe Library. Seven other area public libraries join those two institutions in a project called "Science in the Stacks" which will be a collaboration to create eight rotating science exhibits and appropriate library materials. • New online databases: Valueline, Books-in-Print • Website expansion: Search capabilities were added for Howe Library (thehowe.org) and the Town of Hanover (hanovemh.org) • Children's Programs: In response to demand, an additional Toddler Storytime was added. Personnel: (Italics note changes) Director: Marlene McGonigle; Assistant Director: Ellen Lynch; Office Manager: Janice Grady; Head of Technical Services: Pam Smith; Senior Public Services Librarian: Mary Hardy; Children's Librarian: Denise Reitsma; Circulation Supervisor: Kris Bumett; Public Service Librarians: Polly Gould, Joanne Blais, Mary Ryan; Library Assistants: Ann Schofield, Charlotte Bemini, Lucinda Vamum; Technical Services Assistant: Patti Hardenberg; Circulation Assistants: AmeHa Talbert, Joan Ridgeway, Mary Soderberg, Jan Chapman, Natalie Urmson; After School Monitor: Janet Thompson. The missing name after 24 years of dedicated service to Howe Library is Peggy Hyde, who retired in April but promised to keep "connected." Her contributions are what make Howe Library the vital community institution it is. Thank you, Peggy!

  • Howe Library Trustee report: The Howe Library receives financial support from both the Town of Hanover and the Howe Corporation Board of Trustees. The Howe Corporation has funded many of the capital improvements for the Library over the years, and is the owner of the current library building. The Trustees are elected by the Howe Corporation membership. The Board of Selectmen appoints one of its members to serve as a liaison to the Corporation's Board of Trustees. Trustees were actively involved in several working committees in 1999. Centennial: This committee planned events for community members to celebrate Howe's Centennial; festivities ran from September 1999 to April 2000. A parade kicked off the Centennial celebration in September and a gala dinner featuring Poet Laureate of the United States, Robert Pinsky, in April was the culmination. "Centennial Sundays" featured a variety of programs— including the Gutenberg Bible; rare books; Women, Reading & Education; investment resources; James Joyce; Favorite Books of the Century; poetry readings by Hanover residents; famous children's authors; "Library Quest", a young adult art and writing contest; and accompanying exhibits. (Marilyn Crichlow, chair) Development Planning: The committee began work with a feasibility study to fund an expansion of Howe Library. Since Howe Library does not have a history of active fundraising, the Board decided to implement an annual giving campaign prior to launching a major capital campaign. A consultant was hired to assist with the development of both campaigns. (Cary Clark, chair) Facilities: This committee has been active for four years. Based on findings in the Master Facilities Plan, an architect, Robert A. M. Stem, was hired for an initial design phase for renovation and expansion of Howe Library. Surveys determined that residents wish Howe to remain somewhere in the downtown area. Schematic drawings added 12,000 square feet to the existing 16,000 square feet. The committee plans to seek public input before proceeding. (Stephen Marion, chair) Long Range Planning Update: This committee conducted a survey to confirm Howe's mission and to verify the roles identified to fulfill its mission. The 1996 Long Range Plan and the 1998 Technology Plans were updated at the same time. The Board of Trustees and Hanover Board of Selectmen endorsed both plans. (Chris Vermilya, chair) Meeting Times: The Howe Corporation Board of Trustees meets on the second Thursday of every month at 3:30 pm in the Murray Room of the Howe Library. Members: Matthew Marshall (chair), Marilyn Crichlow (vice chair), Chris Vermilya (treasurer), Marjorie Boley (secretary), Wayne Broehl, Dale Bryant, Jacqueline Clement, William Hamilton, Edward Kerrigan, John Manchester, Stephen Marion, Paul Olsen, Betsy Storrs, Jean Whitall, and Richard Winters.

Hanover Annual Report, 2000

  • Etna Library report: Hanover Town Library, frequently referred to as the Etna Library, provides an up-to-date, multifaceted collection of materials in a beautiful historic setting. The collection contains current fiction and nonfiction, classics, recorded books, and videos. In addition, a rotating collection of videos and unabridged recorded books is provided through the Library's participation in the Librarians of the Upper Valley Cooperative. All of the Library's materials are included on the online catalog shared with Howe Library. As outlined in its 1999 long range plan, Etna Library maintains an active presence in the community through programs and services for both adults and children. In Winter 2000, the Library sponsored a two-month adult reading program which included an evening with Willem Lange. Programs for children at Etna Library include a weekly story time for 3 to 6 year-olds, a biweekly program for children under 3 years, and participation in the State Library's summer reading program. Special events during last year's summer reading program (Reading Cats and Dogs) included a mask-making workshop with Susan Milord, a solar power program by Michael Daly and Michael Caduto's presentation of Native American stories, music and dance. In March 2000, Barbara Prince succeeded Patti Hardenberg as librarian at the Hanover Town Library. In November, Ruth Baker retired after six years of dedicated service as circulation assistant. The new circulation assistant, Geraldine North, previously worked as a volunteer at the Howe Library circulation desk and is known by many through her active participation in local nonprofit organizations. In addition to its paid staff, the Library is strongly supported by a group of about 25 volunteers. Their ongoing donation of time and talent provides the Etna Library with a special feeling of community. Volunteers staff the library on Saturday mornings, run the Winter Reading Program, and organize the annual June picnic/booksale.

  • Etna Library Trustee report: The Trustees for the Hanover Town Library, locally known as the Etna Library, are elected by Hanover voters to oversee the library. Members: The three members of the Etna Library Board of Trustees are John Stebbins (Chair), Amy Stephens, and Judy Danna. Activities: During Fiscal Year 2000, the Trustees interviewed applicants for the Librarian position which was filled in March. In addition, the Board interviewed applicants for the Circulation Assistant position which was filled in November. Other ongoing activities included supervision of the development of the Library budget, implementation of the Library's long range plan and ongoing support for Library services and programs. Long Range Planning Update: A mission statement and long-range plan for the Hanover Town Library were adopted in February 1999. Developed by a committee of community members, the Library's mission statement reads: "The Hanover Town Library will be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building." The goals encompass preservation of the historic building, safe access to the library, and programming for adults and children. During the past year, the Board has focused on maintaining ongoing community involvement in the implementation of the Library's plan. Meeting Times: The Trustees meet at 6:00 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Etna Library. (No meeting in July.)

  • Howe Library report: "In striving to fulfill its mission to bring together people, ideas, and information, Howe Library encourages everyone to read and to enjoy the resources we offer" (Howe Library Mission Statement). Howe Library belongs equally to all citizens of Hanover; so we may say it forms a link to every resident. Taxpayers contribute through the town budget, library corporation members oversee private funding, and non-resident cardholders provide additional revenue. It's a complex web, with all threads leading to one of the most vital destinations in our civic landscape. In the year 2000, we introduced another way to connect you to Howe Library. The Howe Library Corporation introduced our first-ever annual fund drive. Jack Nelson provided leadership and was assisted by newly hired Development Coordinator Jere Nelson. The fund drive exceeded all expectations. Some of the fruits of the fund drive are already evident: new chairs, cushions, magazine racks for teens, and a special online catalog for children. Coming soon you will see a new family learning center with books and computers in the Children's Room. Everyone involved with Fund 2000 deserves our thanks and appreciation. Expansion/ building plans were put on hold when Dartmouth purchased the Hanover Investment Company properties. To explore all options open for building, Howe requested consideration for property acquired by Dartmouth. Cost estimates to compare building onsite vs new construction on land offered by Dartmouth are being studied prior to a Trustee decision on a recommended site and discussion with the Town Board of Selectmen. The construction of the parking garage across the street and the consequent closing/ paving of streets around it, proved a challenge for our patrons. We thank you for your patience, and we hope the convenient parking will make your trip to Howe much easier. Progress: • Grant received: A grant was awarded to Howe Library by the New Hampshire State Library with Library Services and Technology Act funds, matched by the Corporation, for the purchase of KidsOnline, a graphic interface for the children's collection, and for an experiment with wireless technology. (Total: $9,000) • New electronic databases: netLibrary (a collection of thousands of books in electronic format) and Novelist (a readers' advisory). • Website: the Howe website: www. thehowe.org received a major facelift by Webmaster Ellen Lynch. The Hanover Town website is undergoing a department review before changes are implemented to improve the site. • Children's: A kindergarten storytime was introduced and proved so popular that there is waiting list and requests for more sessions. • Public relations: Efforts to reach more residents include welcome brochures, newsletters, and magnets. • Loan periods: Changed loan times provide patrons with less complicated rules and longer loan periods.

  • Howe Library Trustee report: Development Planning: Cary Clark, Chair. The committee continues work to develop a program for Howe Library that includes annual giving, planned giving and a capital campaign for a new or expanded building. A consultant and a development coordinator were hired to assist the committee with these issues. Fund 2000 was launched and successfully surpassed the goal of $50,000. Annual Fund Drive: Jack Nelson Chair. The Fund 2000 drive began in September and ended in December having exceeding its goal by raising over $80,000 dollars. The success is an indication of the broad-base support for Howe Library as a well-loved Hanover institution. Fund 2001 is being planned for a similar time frame. Facilities: Stephen Marion, Chair. This committee has been active for 5 years. The building plans, developed in 1999, were put on hold in 2000 to enable the committee to consider other options for the location of the project. Following the offer of property by Dartmouth College, the Trustees began a comparison study to estimate the costs of each location. A decision is anticipated in Spring 2001 . Members: Matthew Marshall (Chair), Marilyn Crichlow (Vice Chair), Richard Winters (Treasurer), Marjorie Boley (Secretary), Wayne Broehl, Jacqueline Clement, William Hamilton, Edward Kerrigan, Stephen Marion, Jack Nelson, Rick Nothnagel, Paul Olsen, Brian Walsh, Jean Whitall, Ann Bradley (Nominating Chair).

  • Peggy Hyde: "Volunteer, circulation desk, reference desk, acting director, assistant director, public relations director, young adult materials selector, supervisor of work-study students, arts and humanities collection selector, volunteer coordinator, official photographer .... all are positions people hold at the Howe Library. What is amazing is that all of these positions were at one point in time over her 24-year career, held by one person. Our own Peggy Hyde is the woman with multiple talents and far ranging interests, and she has had the energy and the dedication to assume all of these duties and to assume them so well. The Howe Library as we all know and love it today, has been largely shaped by Peggy's zeal and passion for the library. Her belief that a public library is the bedrock of a democratic society was the focus of every decision made during her tenure. Nothing escaped her keen eye, or diverted her role in building upon that bedrock. From being the resident space organizer helping to find the right space for every Library activity, to being the reference desk housekeeper, to being the editor for Howe's creative publications, to coaching volunteers, to planning Library programs, no task was ever too large or too small for Peggy's creative touch. Although small in stature, the space left by Peggy's retirement is huge. Long dubbed the organ grinder by the "monkeys of the back room", we shall miss her music, her ideas, her passion, and her cheerleading for the library. We wish her well in her retirement and eagerly await her return to us as a valuable volunteer. Thank you Peggy!"

Photograph of the interior of the original Howe Library
Photograph of the interior of the original Howe Library

Hanover Annual Report, 2001

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library, also known as the Etna Library, provides a wide range of materials for adults, young adults, and children in a charming historic building. The library provides current fiction and nonfiction, classics and recorded books. In addition, a rotating collection of videos and unabridged recorded books is provided through the library's participation in the Librarians of the Upper Valley Cooperative. All of the Library's materials are included in the online catalog shared with Howe Library. In keeping with the goals of its Long Range Plan, Etna Library maintains a focus on programs for adults and children. Adult library programs include a monthly adult reading group and the Mud Season Reading Program, both run by Leslie Connolly. The 2001 Mud Season Reading Program featured an evening with Deborah Schenck and Lauri Berkenkamp, authors of Fern House: A Year in an Artist's Garden. Programs for young children are held weekly at the Etna Library. Children under three years are introduced to books, rhymes and crafts in Hands on Books on Fridays at 9:30. Children three to six years old participate in Stories and Art on Tuesdays at 10:30. The 2001 summer reading program for children began with Make a Sea Creature Collage with Susan Milord. Weekly summer programs for the whole family included Tangram Creations, Stretching Your Imagination (presented by Sara Buckingham), and Exploring the Art Museum. Also during Summer 2001, Etna Library provided a series of Community Picnics for patrons of all ages. The season began with the annual Community Picnic/Booksale. Additional picnics gave participants the opportunity to eat dinner on the lawn while children were able to participate in a variety of programs: Fun in the Garden (presented by Hazel Weed and Elizabeth Tobiasson), Fun with Sign Language (with Cathy MacDonald), Tales From Around the World (with storyteller Dianne McFarland), and Looking at Rocks and Fossils (with Lorin Amidon). The historic Etna Library Building has seen some improvements in the past year. A new hot water heater provides warm water for the library. The beautiful Waterbury clock was recently repaired and cleaned. The library is strongly supported by a dedicated group of about 25 volunteers. In addition to staffing the library on Saturday mornings, volunteers organize the Mud Season Reading Program for adults, run the annual June picnic/booksale, and contribute in numerous ways to maintain the library's active presence in the community.

  • Etna Library Trustee report: The Trustees for the Hanover Town Library, locally known as the Etna Library, are elected for a three year term by the Hanover voters to oversee the library. Members: Amy Stephens, Judy Danna, and Margaret Bragg Meeting Times: The first Monday of each month at 6:00 pm in the library. (No meeting in July). Mission Statement: The Hanover Town Library will be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building. Activities: The Board of Trustees oversaw the operations of the Etna Library, which enjoyed a year of enhanced programming under the direction of Librarian Barbara Prince. New family and adult programs were added this year. The Trustees also supervised the budget development and continued to work on the long range plan. Long Range Planning Update: The three goals of the plan include building preservation, safe access to the library, and programming for adults and children. The library's antique clock was repaired and the exterior entrance was painted. A new water heater was also installed. New adult programming was added this year. The board continues to explore ideas to improve parking and access to the building. We look forward to another great year in providing library services while maintaining a presence within the community.

  • Howe Library report: When you think "Howe Library", you may see in your mind's eye a building and a collection. However, the staff, in striving to provide each user with personal, excellent service, is the reason, we hope, that you feel a sense of belonging and welcome. Achieving our mission takes work on the part of all involved: Town, Corporation, Staff, and Supporters/Users. Our expansion/building project depends on the cooperation and hard work of all those entities. The process has been a long one, but vital to the success of a building project and, of course, our mission. Examining all options has been a key part of the process and, yes, it has delayed us. The status of the building project as of February 2002 is reported in the Boards and Committees section under Howe Library Board of Trustees. Your patience is appreciated - Howe Library wishes to plan for its long-range future and to plan correctly. Progress: • The Millennium update to the library's automation system, funded by both the Town and the Corporation, was implemented successfully with no disruption in service in October. Modules purchased are being phased in. One new service planned for early in the year is the email notification option for overdue and hold notices. • A new phone system funded by the Town was installed in August and has improved service by adding more lines and establishing a voice mail option for each employee and department. We are still answering the phone in person when we are open! • The transformation of Howe was made possible by Fund 2000 donations. An open house was held in September to celebrate the success and show-off the improvements. Users seem very pleased with the changes which include: Children 's Services: installation of a new family learning center with furniture and computers and relocation of the entire collection to provide a larger pre-school area. Main Floor: Relocation of Reference close to the Circulation Desk; relocation of the entire collection in the Browsing Area and the addition of shelving, lighting, and chairs; relocation of large-type materials; shifting of the entire non-fiction collection to obtain more space. Lower Lobby: Refurbishment to add seating and permit food. • Fund 2001 was completed in December and exceeded its goal of $80,000. Jack Nelson chaired the very successful drive with assistance from Jere Nelson. The effort will result in major improvements in vision and hearing equipment, enhanced programming, especially the new "Authors at the Howe" series, expanded collections, new furniture, and additional public access computers. • Website expansion: Ellen Lynch continues to expand and improve Howe's website: www.thehowe.org and is developing a plan to revise the Town's website. Children's: In response to demand, a Kindergarten Storytime and Toddler's Storytime (featuring the musical talents of Mary Catherine Jones) preceding the Toddler Drop-In were added. • The Corporation contracted with Dartmouth's Rauner Library to catalog and archive the Corporation records dating back to 1899.

  • Howe Library Trustee report: The Board meets on the second Thursday of each month at 3:30 p.m. except during July and August. The Annual Meeting is the second Thursday in October. Committee Highlights, 2001: Development Planning: Cary Clark, Chair. The committee's work is divided into three areas: Annual Fund Drive, Capital Campaign, and Planned Giving. • Annual Fund Drive: Jack Nelson chairs this effort, which successfully completed the second annual drive and exceeded the goal again. More than $80,000 was raised to support projects to enhance the Library. • Capital Campaign: The building project and the campaign to fund it are in the planning stages. • Planned Giving: Vehicles to facilitate planned gifts to Howe were reviewed and are being implemented in brochures. • Facilities: Stephen Marion, Chair. The committee has been active for more than 6 years. Responding to the Long Range Plan of 1996, a Master Facilities Plan was conducted to identify space needs for 20 - 25 years. After hiring Robert A.M. Stern Architects to develop a design concept for the current site, the Trustees thought it their responsibility to investigate additional potential sites offered by Dartmouth College. The sensitivity to other Town building needs contributed to the time of six years for the process to date. Interviews are being conducted to determine if the funds can be raised to expand on the current site with the original Stern plan. A Spring 2002 decision is anticipated. Finance Committee: Jean Whitall, Chair. The Finance Committee developed investment policies during 200 land revised the Howe Corporation Budget format. Non-resident Fees Committee: Ed Kerrigan, Chair. The committee recommended to the Hanover Select Board that fees for Howe Library cards remain the same. Advisory Task Forces: Three were organized to assist with gathering information and support for building expansion. Children's, chaired by Roberta and Dave Parker; Teens, chaired by Nancy Collier; Technology, chaired by Rich Brown.

Hanover Annual Report, 2002

  • ARTICLE TWENTY: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept a .30 acre parcel of land located at 15 East South Street (Map 34, Lot 61), currently owned by the Howe Library Corporation. The parcel would then be merged with the adjoining Town-owned parcel located at 13 East South Street (Map 34, Lot 62), upon which the current Howe Library resides. Once the parcels are combined, the property would be available for future expansion of the Howe Library.

  • Article Twenty: Acceptance of Parcel of Land Owned by Howe Corporation The Howe Library Corporation owns the .30 acre residential parcel located at 15 East South Street, immediately adjacent to the Howe Library which is located at 13 East South Street. The property currently contains an older single family home which will be relocated to a nearby parcel on Currier Place. The Howe Corporation is currently engaged in a fundraising campaign that would enable the expansion and renovation of the current Library building. The expansion would be sited on the 15 East South Street parcel. The Howe Library represents a partnership between the Howe Library Corporation and the Town of Hanover. Dating back to the original construction of the Howe Library, the Town owns the parcel at 13 East South Street, and the Howe Library Corporation owns the Howe Library building. In keeping with that arrangement, the Howe Library Corporation seeks to transfer the adjoining parcel at 15 East South Street to the Town of Hanover. If Town Meeting approves the acceptance of the 15 East South Street parcel, it will be legally merged with the current Howe Library parcel prior to the start of construction. The Board of Selectmen voted to support this article at the Pre-Town Meeting Public Hearing held on April 7, 2003.

  • Howe Library hired Gerrit Zwart, architect of the current library, in association with the firm of Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott, to provide the community with a facility that will adapt to present needs and provide service for future generations. The Facilities Committee, in existence since 1996, together with staff and trustees, have been meeting twice monthly since last June with the architectural team. There have been three public informational meetings held to discuss the renovation of the current building and an expansion of 12,000 square feet to the east. The Trustees of the Howe Library Corporation purchased the property next door in the 1970's to provide this expansion space. The design includes a new wing which will double the space for children's services and provide a choice area for middle school age youth. Collection space will be increased and quiet study areas added. The current building will be updated to provide energy efficiencies. The design beautifully blends the new addition with the current building and enhances the current period architecture of the library. The upcoming capital campaign by the Howe Library Corporation seeks to raise $5 million from private fundraising to cover the cost of the addition/renovation and to provide an endowment to help pay for the increased operating expenses resulting from a larger facility. The public campaign is planned for the fall of 2003 and the target date for breaking ground is spring of 2004.

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library, also known as the Etna Library, provides a wide range of materials for adults, young adults, and children in a charming historic building. The library provides current fiction and nonfiction, classics and recorded books. In addition, a rotating collection of videos and unabridged recorded books is provided through the library's participation in the Librarians of the Upper Valley Cooperative. All of the Library's materials are included on the online catalog shared with Howe Library. • Circulation of materials at the Etna Library increased from 6575 items in the Jan-Dec 2000 year to 7116 items in 2002, an eight percent increase in items checked out. Circulation of adult materials has increased 28 percent. Over the same period, patron visits have increased fifty-two percent, from 2440 patron visits to 3713 patrons visiting the library. Program attendance has increased 74 percent from 747 patrons attending programs in 2000 to 1300 attending in 2002. In keeping with the goals of its Long Range Plan, Etna Library maintains a focus on programs for adults and children. Adult library programs include a monthly adult reading group and the Mud Season Reading Program, both run by Leslie Connolly. The 2002 Mud Season Reading Program featured an evening with poet Cleopatra Mathis, author of What to Pay the Boatman and Centerfor Cold Weather. Programs for young children are held weekly at the Etna Library. Children under three years are introduced to books, rhymes and crafts in Hands on Books on Fridays at 9:30. Children three to six years old participate in Stories and Art on Tuesdays at 10:30. The 2002 summer reading program for children included weekly Stories and Art programs for the whole family. Also during Summer 2002, Etna Library provided a series of Community Picnics for patrons of all ages. The season began with the annual Community Picnic/Booksale. Additional picnics included the programs A Close-up Look at Birds ofthe Upper Valley with Bill Shepard, Draw-A-Tale with Nilda Gomez, Where Do Rocks Come From? with Ron Geason, and Raising Sheep with Lise Richardson. Patrons have enjoyed viewing an ongoing display of beautiful handiwork of local artists at Etna Library. This display has been made possible by a fiber arts rack installed by Richard Ridgeway. Items on display will include quilts, weavings and hooked rugs. The library is strongly supported by a dedicated group of about 25 volunteers. In addition to staffing the library on Saturday mornings, volunteers organize the Mud Season Reading Program for adults, run the annual June picnic/book sale and help in numerous ways to maintain the library's historic presence in the community.

  • Etna Library Trustee report: The Trustees for the Hanover Town Library, locally known as the Etna Library, are elected by the Hanover voters to oversee the library. Members: Judy Danna, Margaret Bragg, and Mary King Meeting Times: The first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m. in the library. (No meeting in July) Mission Statement: The Hanover Town Library will be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building. Ongoing Activities: The trustees provided continuing support for the services and programs offered under the direction of Librarian Barbara Prince. In addition, the trustees supervised the budget development and worked further on the various elements of the long range plan. Long Range Plan Accomplishments: The three goals of the plan encompass programming for adults and children, building preservation, and promotion of library services/fostering of the history of the library. New programming included a children's pajama storytime. A Volunteer Appreciation program featured first-hand presentations by local residents about the library decades ago. A rotating display of handiwork by local craftspeople was added this year. Shelves were built in the corner cabinets. The board continues to explore ideas to further increase shelf space for the library's collection.

  • Howe Library report: Last year was devoted to "the great search for more space." We used your most generous donations to Fund 2001 to reconfigure areas on the main floor to gain space. Until an expansion/renovation is completed, we will continue the burdensome task of discarding a book for each new book we add to the collection. A further example of space constraints: we can respond to the high demand for public access to our databases and the Internet only by adding laptops; there is no room for additional workstations. That said, we are striving not to compromise or diminish the level of service expected at Howe. We are squeezed into the building, but remain attentive to the needs of users. The staff met with architects Gerrit Zwart, Carole Wedge and other team members every other week since early summer. They listened and offered options for staff/Board decisions. The resulting design fully meets the programmatic needs as outlined in the Master Facility Study, updated in 2002. Further, the design enhances the architectural uniqueness of the current building and is well suited to the community of Hanover. We are excited to be on the brink of fulfilling our responsibility to provide quality library service to future generations. The Town of Hanover and the Howe Library Corporation are joined together in a shared financial commitment that is positive and beneficial to the Library. Many, many residents gave time to various committees and to assist with programs and events. Financial support from the Town was enhanced by Corporation Annual Fund 2002 support that enabled us to preserve the Bi-Centennial quilt, purchase high-quality demonstration equipment and software for those with audio/visual special needs, add public access laptops, archive the Corporation records, install a new sound system and spot lighting in the Mayer Room. Collection Development/Reference: Mary Hardy • The reference librarians answered thousands of questions over the past year and borrowed thousands of books from other libraries for our patrons' use. The increasing use of our interlibrary loan service allows access to materials beyond our resources. • We are pleased to be able to offer new reference databases. AncestryPlus is an outstanding database of genealogical and historical documents for genealogy enthusiasts. Other new databases include the EBSCO magazine and newspaper index; the Academic Search Elite database of journals in the social sciences, humanities, general science, multicultural studies and education; and MagillOnAuthors, a database of authors who have made important contributions in the areas of long and short fiction, poetry, drama and philosophy. People may access these databases from home by way of our website (using your library card number) or on one of our Internet terminals in the library. AncestryPlus may be accessed in the library. Public Relations/Programs and Exhibits: Ellen Lynch • The inaugural season of "Authors at The Howe," organized by Tom and Dianne McFarland, was a highlight of 2001-2002. The six events featured seven authors (including three state poet laureates) of adult fiction, poetry, and children's books. It was an auspicious beginning for a series that will continue at the Howe. • Other programs are several that are also organized by volunteers: the play reading series, film series and a music program. Nita Choukas and Joan Snell alternate selecting the plays and moderating the evenings of play readings. For many years Bruce Posner, a film historian, has been producing a lively and thought-provoking film series. The Bach Study Group, a longstanding program directed by volunteers and sponsored by Howe, brings the enjoyment of music to its many participants. • The monthly art exhibits in the Mayer Room, which are coordinated by volunteer Dick Ridgeway, provide an opportunity for local artists to showcase their work for the public. The volunteer members of the Upper Valley Camera Club organize the annual Elden Murray Photography Exhibit and Contest for Howe Library. We are appreciative of the work of these volunteers in creating fine programs and exhibits. Youth Services: Denise Reitsma • The children's program serves children from infants to middle school students. To be more inclusive, the title "Youth Services" will be used to designate services to this age group. The library staff feel, that while high school teens are seen as adults, middle school teens will benefit by being more actively included in Youth Services. This group uses the library for recreational and school-assigned reading and research projects. • Susan Milord was hired and is adding her artistic expertise to our storytimes as well as assisting patrons in the children's room. Her first children's picture book will be published in spring, 2003. • We continue to offer four weekly storytimes. These and our special programs have been well attended, some to capacity. The summer reading program's theme of "Lions and Tigers and Books, Oh My!" lent itself to some interesting programming including a live animal show from the Peabody Zoo, which included a 13 -foot python and a 10-inch-long scorpion. This past year the morning preschool storytime included children from eight countries. Expanding a child's world through books is every librarian's joy, and we look forward to another year of doing just that! Circulation 2002: Kristina Burnett Among public libraries in New England, Howe Library continues to rank among the highest in per capita circulation. In FY 2001-02, the Howe staff has served over 213,002 patrons (or almost 700 per day), who borrowed over 197,857 items and used an additional 33,700 books, magazines and newspapers in-house. Books on CD and tape, videos and DVDs continue to be popular. Computers are in constant use for email, internet research and database reference use. Children's materials still account for more than one-third of total circulation. Technical Services and Systems: Pam Smith • The Technical Services Department had an active and challenging year, with constant change being the norm. We coordinated the addition of e-mail notices to our circulation services. Patrons may now receive overdue and hold notices by e-mail. While maintaining high standards, we continue to operate with little to no backlog. Howe is responsible for ordering, cataloging and maintaining the Etna Library records. • The technology responsibilities continue to grow as we expand our public access network. Howe now offers 15 public access computers. We have workstations for adults and children; two e-mail-only computers, and wireless laptops that may be checked out at the circulation desk for use in the library.

  • Howe Library Trustee report: Development Program: Cary Clark, Chair. The committee's work successfully established three programs for Howe Library: Annual Fund Drive, Capital Campaign, and Planned Giving. • Annual Fund Drive: Jack Nelson chairs this effort, which successfully completed the third annual drive in a difficult fundraising year. • Capital Campaign: The capital campaign to support the expansion/renovation project was launched with a Steering Committee and a Capital Campaign Committee. Co-Chairs are Ralph Manuel and Joan Fowler; members are: • Planned Giving: A brochure was developed and distributed at the Annual Corporation Meeting and to various area agencies. Facilities: Stephen Marion, Chair. The committee has been active for more than 7 years. Sensitivity to other Town building needs and to the size and cost of a project acceptable to the community contributed to the delay in the process of moving ahead with an expansion project. The Corporation hired the architect of the present building, Gerrit Zwart, who came from retirement to work on the project in association with Shepley Bulfmch Richardson and Abbott of Boston. The charge is to design an expansion/renovation with approximately 12,000 more square feet within a budget of $5 million dollars. The plans will be completed early in the spring, 2003, and meet the library's objectives in a manner that enhances the unique architectural design of the current Howe Library. In three public meetings the community has been very receptive to the design. We are optimistic about a timeline and hope to have a ground-breaking ceremony in the spring of 2004. Advisory Task Forces: Three were organized to assist with gathering information and support for building expansion. Children's, chaired by Roberta and Dave Parker; Teens, chaired by Nancy Collier; Technology, chaired by Ron Boehm. The three committees have provided valuable input for the architects. Finance: Paul Olsen, Chair. The Committee meets quarterly with the investment advisors to review the portfolio. Governance: Bill Hamilton, Chair. The Committee updated the By-Laws and proposed changes in addition to fulfilling responsibilities to nominate the officers of the Board of Trustees. Long Range Plan Update: Marilyn Crichlow, Chair. The committee completed the tliree year update to the original 1996 LRP. The update was approved by the Trustees and endorsed by the Board of Selectmen. Non-resident Fees Committee: Ed Kerrigan, Chair. The committee recommended to the Hanover Select Board that fees for Howe Library cards remain the same.

Hanover Annual Report, 2003

  • ARTICLE TWENTY-FOUR: To see if the Town will accept the provisions of RSA 202-A: 4-c

providing that any town at an annual meeting may adopt an article authorizing indefinitely, until
specific rescission of such authority, the public library trustees to apply for, accept and expend,
without further action by the Town Meeting, unanticipated money from a state, federal or other
governmental unit or a private source which becomes available during the fiscal year.

 

Selectmen For: 4; Against: 0; Absent: 1 

  • Article Twenty-Four: Authorization Enabling Library Trustees to Accept and Expend Cash Gifts In 1997, Town Meeting adopted RSA 202-A: 4-d, enabling the Howe and Etna Libraries to accept personal property donations (e.g., art work, furnishings, etc) as municipal entities. Curiously, at that time Town Meeting was not asked to adopt the companion RSA 202-A: 4-c, which enables both Libraries to accept and expend cash gifts, presumably because it was either assumed this RSA had been adopted by an earlier Town Meeting or because cash gifts of a substantial nature have typically been given only to the Howe Library Corporation (a private entity) rather than to the Town of Hanover on behalf of the Howe. A recent review of Town records, however, reveals that Town Meeting has never adopted RSA 202-A: 4-c. Given that both the Howe and Etna Libraries regularly receive cash donations and expend such donations for the purposes for which the donations are intended (generally to enhance certain aspects of both Libraries' collections), the Board of Selectmen is requesting that Town Meeting officially adopt RSA 202-A: 4-c to formalize and legitimize these gifts and their related expenditure. The Board of Selectmen voted 4-0 with one member absent to support this article during the PreTown Meeting public hearing held on April 5, 2004.

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library provides a wide range of materials for adults, young adults, and children. Circulating materials include current fiction and nonfiction, classics and recorded books. In addition, a rotating collection of videos and unabridged recorded books is provided through the library's participation in the Librarians of the Upper Valley Cooperative. All of the Library's materials are included in the online catalog shared with Howe Library. Statistics from FY 2000 to FY 2003 show a notable increase in Etna Library services. Patron visits have increased 47%, from 2,724 to 3,998 visits a year. Circulation of adult items has increased 29%, from 2,447 items to 3,161 items, and overall circulation has increased 14%, from 6,469 items to 7,369 items. Number of programs has increased 67%, from 67 to 112 programs, and program attendance has increased 109%, from 730 to 1,526 participants. Interlibrary loans borrowed from other libraries has increased 329%, from 34 items to 146 items. The library's mission statement summarizes its services and programs: "The Hanover Town Library will be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building." Adult library programs include a monthly adult reading group and the Mud Season Reading Program. The 2003 Mud Season Reading Program featured an evening with Janet Evanovich talking about her Stephanie Plum novel, To The Nines. In May, Professor Jere Daniell presented a talk on Town and Village in New Hampshire. Programs for young children are held weekly at the Etna Library. Children under three years are introduced to books, rhymes and crafts in Hands on Books on Fridays at 9:30 a.m. Children three to six years old participate in Stories and Art on Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. Additional programs for children of all ages included a Halloween Sing-Along with Marcia Williams and Stories From Around the World with Judy Witters. During Summer 2003, Etna Library presented a series of Community Picnics for patrons of all ages. The season began with the annual Community Picnic/Booksale. Additional picnics included John Stadler showing his new picture book Catilda, Sarah Masters Buckey reading her new children's book Gangsters at the Grand Atlantic, Tom Jacobs sharing a woodworking project for children, and Nilda Gomez presenting a Listen and Draw program. Stories and Art for the Whole Family was presented weekly throughout the summer. The Hanover Town Library is strongly supported by a dedicated group of about 25 volunteers. Volunteers staff the library on Saturday mornings, organize the Mud Season Reading Program for adults, and support the summer community picnic series as well as the annual June book sale. The Centennial Committee is planning a series of programs for adults and children to celebrate the library's 100th birthday in August 2005. Members of the committee are Beth Vesley, Paula Berg, Chris Bentivoglio and Rhonda Siegel. In anticipation of the centennial celebration, the Hanover Town Library is featured in the 2004 Hanover Town Calendar. In May 2003, Etna Library volunteers, Etna residents and the Etna Ladies Aid met to share memories of life over the years in Etna. This conversation was the starting point of planning for the Hanover Town Library Centennial. At the Etna Old Timers Fair, library volunteers staffed a table where visitors could identify photographs of local people and places, as well as antiquarian tools. Etna Library was represented in the Etna Old Timers Fair and the Fourth of July parades by "The Library on the Hill" float, crafted by Tom Jacobs. A library display of beautiful quilts, organized by Geraldine North, has been greatly enjoyed by patrons. Artists who loaned a quilt for display from January to December 2003 were Kris Burnett, Pat Clinton, Rosalie Cutter, Jann Block, Shirley Hudson, Jane Buskey, Mary Hardy, Linda Bowden, Fran Baschnagel and Geraldine North.

  • Etna Library Trustee report: The Hanover Town Library, know locally as the Etna Library, has been an important part of life in Etna Village for over a century. In 1899 the Etna Library and Debating Society merged its books with one hundred dollars' worth of books donated by the State of New Hampshire and began lending the books from Hayes Hall. The library building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was built in 1 905 and is featured in the 2004 Town of Hanover calendar. To commemorate the centennial, the volunteer committee which created the calendar is planning a series of celebratory events to begin this summer and continue through the summer of 2005. The Trustees of the Hanover Town Library are elected for three-year terms by the Hanover voters to oversee the library. Mission Statement: The Hanover Town Library will be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building. Activities: The Board of Trustees oversaw the operations of the Etna Library, which experienced another year of growth in patron visits, programs offered, and circulation of materials. The trustees supervised the development of the budget, hosted officers of the New Hampshire Library Trustees Association, and approved replacement of the library's carpeting. Installation of additional shelving, improvement of parking, and accessibility are ongoing projects.

  • Howe Library report: This past year was one of hope. The staff was revitalized with the realization that the long awaited building program was truly underway. The experience of working with the original architect of the current building, Gerrit Zwart, in association with Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott of Boston, has been positive beyond our hopes. The architects have listened. Although the planning for the new building, as well as the capital campaign to raise $5.5 million for expansion and complete renovation, has been added to an already full schedule for the staff, everyone has been involved and all have expressed appreciation for that opportunity. The project developed smoothly and, when completed, will answer the needs of the community for continued excellence in library service well into the future. During the transition, each department will need to be relocated to a temporary location and collections will need to be moved at least once. We will remain open during construction and seek your patience. Plans for ground-breaking in April, 2004 translate into excitement for all involved with the Library. Our cooperative ventures with area institutions - Hanover schools, ValleyNet, and the Montshire Museum continue and were expanded this year by new, interesting joint projects with the Hood Museum and the Hopkins Center of Dartmouth College, the Upper Valley Community Foundation and Vermont Public Radio. The Town of Hanover and the Howe Library Corporation are joined together in a shared financial commitment to Howe Library. Our thanks to the many, many people, including those serving on various committees, who volunteered their time at the Library during this past year. - Marlene McGonigle, Director

  • Collections/Reference: Mary Hardy • The Library was pleased to offer a new "Books-to-Go" service. Sets of 25 bags, each containing ten copies of a title along with reviews, author information, and discussion guides. Designed for book groups, this service is so successful we are doubling the offering in 2004. • Two new databases may be accessed from Library terminals or from your home using our website: Britannica Online includes encyclopedia articles, daily news archives, and access to past editions; Contemporary Authors is a bio-bibliographical source.

  • Public Relations/Programs and Exhibits: Ellen Lynch • The second season of Authors at The Howe, supported by Fund 2002, presented well-known children's and adult authors: Reeve Lindbergh, Jodi Piccoult, Ernest Hebert, Alison Funk, Cleopatra Mathis, Trina Shart Hyman and Katrin Hyman Tchana. • Book discussions included: Out of Asia: Novels of Japan; With Earth in Mind; and Traditions, a series of programs on New England music and culture. • Writers on Writing series presented five programs of local authors talking about recent books and writing experiences. • Cine Salon, Bruce Posner's film series was presented in the fall and spring. • Play Reading is a series organized by volunteers Nita Choukas and Joan Snell. Plays included works by T.S. Eliot and August Wilson. • Monthly art exhibits with receptions, the Bach Study Group, and the Elden Murray Photography Exhibition rounded out a bountiful year of programs and exhibits.

  • Youth Services: Denise Reitsma • Last spring our talented assistant, Susan Milord, published her first children's book, Willa the Wonderful. Susan left us in January 2004 to pursue her writing career full time. Mary Danko was hired and has quickly become a vital member of our staff. • Four weekly storytimes continue although there is demand for more. The Squam Lake Science Center and VTNS were featured for special programs by naturalists. The summer reading program - Reading Rocks the Granite State - included cooperative programs with Lorin Amidon, a geologist from Dartmouth and special prizes donated by The Wall (climbing wall). • We continued to hold successful joint programs with Joanne Cimato, the Librarian at the Ray School. Denise spent a week at the school reading to every class and doing book talks with Joanne Cimato. • Thanks to Fund 2000, we purchased an original work of art, The Fortune Teller, by Trina Shart Hyman. 

  • Circulation: Kristina Burnett • Among the public libraries in New England, Howe Library continues to rank among the highest in per capita circulation. Between July 2002 and June 2003, the Circulation staff served over 217,750 patrons who borrowed 206,174 items and used an additional 27,346 books, magazines and newspapers in-house. Books on CD and tape, videos and DVDs continue to be popular, accounting for an estimated 21% of the total circulation. Children's materials account for more than 1/3 of the total circulation. • An upgrade to our system, Millennium, was accomplished with minimum disruption for the public. • The Circulation staff continued to work with architects to finalize the design. The transition during construction is being carefully planned.

  • Technical Services/Systems: Pamela Smith • The department focuses on planning and teledata needs for the entire building. • Volunteers and staff processed and added nearly 5,000 new items. Due to space constraints, we discarded over 5,500. One item in, one item out is the current policy dictated by lack of space. • A major upgrade to Millennium was performed successfully. The online catalog was enhanced with book jacket images. • A server (Z39.50) was implemented to greatly expand our catalog beyond library walls. Patrons may now, with one search, execute searches in other libraries in NH. Likewise, patrons in remote locations may now search the Libraries of Hanover catalog using this technology. • Cataloging, serials maintenance, and online ordering are centralized at Howe for both Etna and Howe libraries. Soon, Howe will also be responsible for Etna's contributions to the NHState Library Automated Network. • Volunteers logged more than 230 hours in Technical Services.

  • Personnel: {Italics note new staff) We were saddened June 27, 2003 with the loss of long-time friend and staff member, Mary Soderberg. Mary retired in 1997, after starting work in 1976, but remained on the staff as a substitute at the Circulation desk. We, staff and patrons, benefited from the quiet, kind, efficient manner of this gentle woman. One of Mary's small quilts is being framed so her presence will continue to be felt here and in the expanded facility. Mary's neighbors have donated funding for two benches in the garden of the new library.

  • Howe Library Trustee report: Annual Fund Drive: Jack Nelson chairs this effort, which was incorporated into the Capital Campaign for 2003. The proceeds from Fund 2002 enhanced the Library in many ways. Anew service for book discussion groups was started. We continued the successful Authors at The Howe series. Ceramic logs were installed in the fireplace in the Aldrich Room to encourage patrons to relax on cold winter days. We purchased more laptops (no space for desktops!) and added a second Howe Library sign to the outside of the building. Collections were enhanced and an original work of art by Trina Shart Hyman was purchased. • Capital Campaign: The capital campaign to support the expansion/renovation project was launched with a Steering Committee and a Capital Campaign Committee. Co-Chairs are Ralph Manuel and Joan Fowler. The Committee's goal was to raise $2 million by December '03. The goal was surpassed when $2.8 million was raised as a result of a matching Challenge to Corporation Members. The Committee held a very successful kick-off event for the campaign in September and a cooperative fundraising event with the Hood Museum in October. Solicitation will continue until building completion in 2005. Pledges are encouraged through January 2006. Committee members contributing to the success of the campaign are: Marilyn Black, Cheryl Boghosian, Ann Bradley, Tom Byrne, Jan Chapman, Elizabeth Crory, Posey Fowler, Shelley Gilbert, Toni LaMonica, Allegra Lubrano, Ralph Manuel, Katie Manchester, Matt Marshall, Martha McDaniel, Marlene McGonigle, Jane Kitchel McLaughlin, Jere Nelson, Jack Nelson, Brian Walsh, Annette Williams, Sybil Williamson, and Richard Winter. • Planned Giving: A brochure was developed and distributed. The Trustees are pleased that four individuals have stepped forward to indicate support for Howe in the future through their bequests. Facilities: Stephen Marion, Chair. The committee has been active for more than 8 years. The architect of the present building, Gerrit Zwart, in association with Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott of Boston, completed building plans in the Spring and finalized them for bid in January 2004. 12,000 new square feet are planned for the current building of 18,000 sq. ft. The cost is $5 million for construction and renovation and $500,000 for an endowment to provide additional funds for higher operating costs funded by the Town. A May 2004 groundbreaking is anticipated with completion sometime after April '05. The plans respond to Library needs in a manner that enhances the current building and provides the opportunity for excellent library service in the future. Advisory Task Forces: Three committees were organized to assist with the building expansion and to provide advocacy for the project. They continue to provide valuable input for the architects and are being called upon to help with the staging plans when some departments will be relocated during construction.

Hanover Annual Report, 2004

  • Selectmen's letter: A summer completion date is anticipated for the new 12,000 square foot addition and renovation of the existing building with a fall gala planned to celebrate the opening. In the new addition spaces soar to inspiring heights while at the same time producing interesting nooks and crannies. The new Children's Room, new Teen Area and art gallery will be the highlights of the new building, but all areas will be integrated into a wonderfully functioning public library. The target goal, $5.5 million, for the project is being raised privately by the Howe Library Corporation as a gift to the Town of Hanover. This amount includes $500,000 for an endowment to assist the Town with increased operating expenses for the library. $240,000 remains to be raised to qualify for the prestigious Kresge Foundation Award. That goal must be reached by June 31, 2005 to acquire $250,000 from Kresge. In anticipating that the Capital Campaign will conclude successfully in June, the community deserves many thanks for continuing to open its heart to the opportunity to support the library project. It is hoped that with characteristic Hanover generosity the fLiiiding will be eomplcted. This unique partnership between the Town of Hanover and the Howe Library Corporation will ensure the treasure we call Howe Library will serve future generations well.

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library provides a wide range of materials for adults, young adults, and children. Circulating materials include current fiction and nonfiction, classics and recorded books. In addition, a rotating collection of videos and recorded books is provided through the library's participation in the Librarians of the Upper Valley Cooperative. All of the library's materials are included on KnowHowe, the online catalog of the Howe Library. Directions, library hours and programs at the Etna Library are publicized on its webpage (www. hanovernh.org/etnalibrary) The library's mission statement summarizes its services and programs: "The Hanover Town Library will be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building." In October 2004, a new computer was installed to provide Internet access to the public. This computer provides access to the KnoweHowe web page with its online catalog and numerous resources. Patrons can now pursue Internet research and access their e-mail at the Etna Library. Several improvements have been made to the historic Etna Library building during the past year. The outdoors railing has been extended to the entrance. In addition, the installation of new carpeting has given a fresh feeling to the beautiful interior with its hazelwood ceiling and shelving. Community use of Etna Library services continues to grow. Between fiscal years 2000 and 2004, patron visits have increased 74 percent. Circulation has increased 38 percent with borrowing of items in the adult section increasing the most. Number of programs has increased 70 percent and program attendance has increased 172 percent. Adult library programs include a monthly book group that reads a variety of classic and contemporary books. The Mud Season Reading Program provides visitors with the opportunity to fill in review slips about books they have read. This six-week program culminates in a festive evening of refreshments and prize-drawing with a local author. The 2004 Mud Season Reading featured New Hampshire Poet Laureate Cynthia Huntington, author of We Have Gone to the Beach, The Radiant, and The Salt House: a Summer on the Dunes of Cape Cod. Two weekly programs for young children are held at the Etna Library. Children under three years are introduced to books, rhymes and crafts in Hands on Books on Fridays at 9:30. Children three to six years old participate in Stories and Art on Tuesdays at 10:30. Additional programs for children of all ages included a Valentines Making Program, Starting to Knit with Jennifer Congdon, Postage Stamp Art, and a Halloween Crafts Party. During Summer 2004, Etna Library presented a series of Community Picnics for patrons of all ages. The season began with the annual Community Picnic/Book Sale. Additional picnics included Valley News writer Bruce Wood describing his experiences as a sports writer, Suzanne Serat demonstrating the spinning wheel, Leslie Connolly presenting a circus story and craft, airline pilot Michael Costello telling about flying commercial and private planes, former astronaut Jay Buckey talking about space exploration and Mars, and Bruce Genereaux, author of Beyond the Comfort Zone, showing slides of extreme skiing at Tuckerman's Ravine, rock climbing in Yosemite and Whitewater kayaking. In addition. Stories and Art for the Wliole Family, a program of books and crafts, was presented weekly throughout the summer. Mary King, a long time volunteer at Etna Library, joined the library as circulation assistant in October 2004. Many patrons know Mary through her work as Volunteer Coordinator for Good Beginnings. Mary succeeds Geraldine North who was circulation assistant for four years at the Etna Library. Geraldine continues to organize the popular rotating display of fiber arts created by local artists. Artists who loaned an item for display at the library this year are Patricia Clinton, Kristina Burnett, Geraldine North, Jane Buskey and Natalie Urmson. The Hanover Town Library is strongly supported by a dedicated group of about 25 volunteers who staff the library on Saturday mornings. In addition, they produce the Mud Season Reading Program, the annual June book sale and the summer community picnic series. The Etna Library Centennial Committee (Beth Vesley, Paula Berg, Chris Bentivoglio and Rhonda Siegel) has organized a year of celebratory events fi-om Fall 2004 through Summer 2005. Their first task was to obtain information on the history of the Hanover Town Library and to introduce its centennial to the community. The committee's research resulted in the 2004 Town of Hanover Calendar which featured the library's one hundred years of service to the community. At the June Etna Fair, the committee presented a centennial display staffed by Etna Library volunteers. Many people stopped by the table to identify historical photographs of Etna. The Thanksgiving Pie Sale, organized by the committee to raise money for the centennial, was very successful due to the beautiful selection of pies donated by the Etna Ladies Aid and the Etna Library volunteers. Other committee activities have included the development of a Hanover Town Library logo and the commissioning of a painting of the library. Upcoming centennial events include an extended Mud Season Reading Program, summertime programs with children's authors, a traveling Hanover Town Library exhibit and videotaped book reviews presented by children. The Hanover Town Library Centennial will culminate in a festive celebration party in August 2005.

  • Etna Library Trustee report: The Hanover Town Library, know locally as the Etna Library, has been an important part of life in Etna Village for over a century. In 1899 the Etna Library and Debating Society merged its books with one hundred dollars' worth of books donated by the Stale of New Hampshire and began lending the books from Hayes Hall. The library building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was built in 1905 and was featured in the 2004 Town of Hanover calendar. To commemorate the centennial, the volunteer committee which created the calendar has planned a series of celebratory events which began last summer and will continue through this summer. The Trustees of the Hanover Town Library are elected for three-year terms by the Hanover voters to oversee the library. Mission Statement: The Hanover Town Library will be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building. Activities: The Board of Trustees oversaw the operations of the Etna Library, which experienced another year of growth in patron visits, programs offered, and circulation of materials. The Library has a new Circulation Assistant, and a new Trustee to finish the year for the senior Trustee, who is now the aforementioned Circulation Assistant. The Trustees supervised the development of the budget, and worked with the Librarian to develop an internet policy. A new computer has been installed to provide internet access to our patrons. The railing in the front of the building was recently continued all the way to the top landing of the front door, greatly improving access. Installation of additional shelving is an ongoing project.

  • Howe Library report: I watch a changing timber frame roof against the sky each day from my office. The welcome upheaval of construction is upon us and progress is visible every day. The project is moving along toward completion in the summer of 2005. We have additional staging moves on the near horizon after successfully moving Children's to the Mayer Room. The timetable shows a move by Administration into the new area (previous Children's area) early in May. Various collections will move as the addition is completed beginning June 1 . We plan to call on many of you to volunteer your time to help us move books. It has been an unsettling time for all of us, but we encourage you, as users, to remember that we soon will have our desperately needed expansion. You will love the "new" Howe Library. Weekly construction updates are available by email (contact Marlene.McGonigle (Sjthehowe.org). Throughout all the planning for the new building and now actual construction each Howe staff member has been involved and all have expressed appreciation for that opportunity. With a smile all have willingly participated, adding to already full work schedules. A "Happiness Committee" was instituted in June to attempt to ease the chaos around us by providing a variety of serendipitous events for our users and for the staff: Little surprises of food, massages, lessons (basket weaving and knitting), and secret gifts and for our users, coffee/lemonade and doughnuts on occasional Saturday mornings. We continued a full complement of programming for children and adults which is found in the reports that follow. We will remain open during construction for all but an odd few days. Plans for a gala opening next fall 2005 translate into excited and hopeful staff and users! Our cooperative ventures with area institutions, Hanover schools, ValleyNet, Montshire Museum, continue and were expanded by programs with the Upper Valley Community Foundation, Hood Museum, Hanover Rotary and Vermont Public Radio. The Town of Hanover and the Howe Library Corporation continue their partnership of a shared financial commitment that is positive and beneficial to the Library. The Annual Fund 2004 was reinstituted and has raised more than $46,000 toward a $50,000 goal as of December 31, 2004. The news that we had been granted a Kresge Foundation Challenge award of $250,000 has gratified us all. Kresge 's prominence and the recognition that awards are given to organizations on the road to success, has been heartening. Ellen Lynch wrote the grant application and deserves kudos from all. As of this writing, we need to raise $353,000 before July 1, 2005 to meet our goal. The outpouring of support from the Corporation and community members has been fulfilling. We are very proud to have raised $3.4 million for Howe Library. Thanks to the efforts of Dick Winters, Posey Fowler, Ralph Manuel and many others we are seeing our critical need for expansion realized. As the director of this treasure, I am indeed blessed to be with Howe during this part of its history. - Marlene McGonigle, Director.

  • Public Relations/Programs and Exhibits: Ellen Lynch The third season of Authors at The Howe included best-selling authors Jeffrey Lent, Archer Mayor and Caroline Alexander. Kendal at Hanover co-hosted the Jeffery Lent and Caroline Alexander events in their Gathering Room, providing a generous and comfortable venue for speakers and audience. The book discussion series titled America From Afar, was part of the "What's New Hampshire Reading?" program sponsored by the NH Humanities Council. Another book discussion, American Food & Families, featured memoirs of restaurant critics and chefs and included treats by Howe staff member Joan Ridgeway from recipes in the books. The play reading series, organized by volunteers Nita Choukas and Joan Snell, read a variety of plays including works by Shaw, Hansberry, Miller and Gumey. Bruce Posner's Cine Salon film series presented unusual and rare films. Writers on Writing series presented four programs of local authors talking about their recent books and writing experiences. The Bach Study Group met weekly at Howe until April when the group moved temporarily to the new RW Black Community Center due to Howe's construction. The monthly art exhibits in the Mayer Room continued through March 2004 in Howe's meeting rooms. The 55+ Senior Art exhibit in June took place at the new R W Black Community Center. The Murray Photography Show will also move to the Community Center in 2005 on a temporary basis until the completion of Howe's renovation and addition project.

  • Youth Services: Denise Reitsma If you haven't been in the library for a few months, you may have trouble finding the children's room. Just follow the red arrows and you'll find us downstairs in our temporary quarters until our new space is ready. We made the big move with help from volunteers of all ages and managed to fit almost the whole collection in the Mayer Room. We are continuing our program schedule of 5 storytimes every week in a small room adjacent to the children's room. We've added a lapsit program for very young children on Mondays and have programs for toddlers, preschoolers, and kindergartners. We also have special programs after school once a month for older children. Mary Danko joined our staff in January, replacing Susan Milord. Mary works 20 hours a week and does the programming for the lapsit and toddlers and some after school programs. Mary also does displays and signs and other projects that put her artistic talents to good use. We have collaborated with both the Hopkins Center and the Hood Museum in presenting family programs and a book discussion for middle-schoolers. Due to our temporary lack of a large program space, we have sponsored two storytelling events at the community center and have some ongoing programs and future events planned there also. 

  • Circulation: Kristina Burnett Circulation at the Howe Library has continued on a steady rise. Fiscal 2003 - 2004, circulation was 215,440, an increase over the previous year of over 9000 items. Materials used in house over 2003 - 2004 totaled almost 31,000, with a grand circulation total of almost 247,000 items circulating in the last fiscal year. Books on CD, a growing DVD collection, as well as videos and books on tape, account for almost 1/5 of our circulation. Children's materials account for more than 1/3 of the total circulation. During the summer months, the staff planned for the beginning of the transition period between the old and new Howe Libraries, which would begin in the early fall. The children's room would move downstairs to the Mayer Room, where circulation and reference services will take place during the course of the building process. The circulation staff continues to work with architects, builders and other staff to minimize disruption to the public during this transition phase.

  • Collections and Information Service: Mary Hardy The library has been a very busy place in spite of our construction project. We are pleased to notice people making good use of our collections, reference/information services and our public internet terminals for a variety of needs. New databases include the Historical New York Times (1851-2001), the Union Leader and the online version of Books in Print. Through NHLink (New Hampshire State Library) we are also able to offer two genealogical databases: Ancestiy Library Edition (which replaces and improves Ancestiy Plus) and Heritage Quest. Technical Services: Pamela Smith The Technical Services Department has been closely involved with planning for the new building. Working with the MIS department we have planned for the technology expansion and the communications wiring in the new building. Technical Services has been operating temporarily in the Murray Room since construction began last April. We added over 5,000 new items to the Howe and Etna collections this past year. Technical Services also performed a major upgrade to our Millennium system which added a number of significant enhancements.

  • Howe Library Trustee report: Annual Fund Drive: Jane Kitchel McLaughlin chaired this effort, which resumed after not being held in 2003. The proceeds from Fund 2004 are being used to supplement programming for the Library. As of January 13, 2005, $47,000 was received. This is a wonderfial response considering the Library is still in capital campaign mode. • Capital Campaign: The highlight of the year was the award by The Kresge Foundation of $250,000 which will be given if the campaign goal is met by June 30, 2005. The capital campaign to support the expansion/renovation project is headed by Co-Chairs Ralph Manuel and Joan Fowler. As of December 3 1, $3.4 million was raised. The amount remaining for the Kresge Challenge is $353,000. Pledges are encouraged through January 2006. The fundraiser that can take Howe over the top is the selling of engraved pavers for the Children's Garden at $200 each. Committee members contributing to the success of the campaign are: Marilyn Black, Cheryl Boghosian, Ann Bradley, Tom Byrne, Jan Chapman, Elizabeth Crory, Posey Fowler, Shelley Gilbert, Toni LaMonica, Allegra Lubrano, Ralph Manuel, Katie Manchester, Matt Marshall, Martha McDaniel, Marlene McGonigle, Jane Kitchel McLaughlin, Jere Nelson, Jack Nelson, Brian Walsh, Annette Williams, Sybil Williamson, Richard Winters. • Planned Giving: A brochure was developed and distributed. The Trustees received two bequests during the year and are pleased that two other individuals have stepped forward to indicate support for Howe in the future through their bequests. Facilities/Construction: Stephen Marion, Chair. After a May 2004 ground breaking and some complications in the initial building phase, construction has moved along well. A summer 0505 completion is anticipated. Trumbull-Nelson is the construction management firm hired for the project. The Construction Committee meets monthly and includes in addition to Steve Marion, the Clerk of the Works, Stephen Wheelock; the architect, Gerrit Zwart; the USDA representative, Gregg MacPherson; Chair of the Trustees, Posey Fowler; Project Manager from T-N, Todd Thompson; Trustee, Rich Nothnagel; and Library Director, Marlene McGonigle. Finance: Edward T. Kerrigan, Chair. The Committee meets quarterly with the investment advisors to review the portfolio. The Committee was charged with obtaining a construction loan and a USDA Rural Development loan for the building project. Both loans were approved in 2004. Governance: Bill Hamilton, Chair. There were no major updates to the By-Laws in 2004. The Committee fulfilled responsibilities to nominate the officers of the Board of Trustees. Non-resident Fees Committee: Ann Bradley, Chair. The Committee meets in January and February to review non-resident fees and to make a recommendation to the Select Board to leave the fees as they are or to increase the fees for library cards.

  • ARTICLE TWENTY-FOUR: To see if the Town will accept the provisions of RSA 202-A: 4-c providing that any town at an annual meeting may adopt an article authorizing indefinitely, until specific rescission of such authority, the public library trustees to apply for, accept and expend, without further action by the Town Meeting, unanticipated money from a state, federal or other governmental unit or a private source which becomes available during the fiscal year. Article Twenty-Four is a housekeeping article. This is a blanket authorization for the Etna Library to apply for and receive gifts. It is necessary for Town Meeting to authorize this. Margaret Fanning requested that this article be pulled out for a separate vote. Chairman Walsh's original motion was modified to reflect the removal of Article Twenty-Four from the consent calendar per the request of Margaret Farming. It was MOVED by Chairman Walsh and SECONDED by Barbara Price to approve Article TwentyFour as written in the warrant. Margaret Fanning stated she is concerned that if there are private sources of funding that might come from sources, they may want some type of commercial endorsement. Margaret Fanning MOVED and was SECONDED that the wording of Article Twenty-Four be modified to add the phrase "so long as there is no endorsement or advertising of commercial entities or products resulting". Chairman Walsh, as mover of Article Twenty-Four, ACCEPTED the motion. Tom Jacobs, Etna Library Trustee, wants to make sure the wording is carefully written so the Trustees have the ability to acknowledge someone's contribution, even if they are a company or foundation. The Trustees should have the freedom to acknowledge them. Moderator Black read the amendment that states that the Etna Library would be able to accept monies or gifts "so long as there is no endorsement or advertising of commercial entities or products resulting". Bill Harper, of Crowley Terrace said he feels that this should be left to the discretion of the Trustees and residents should vote no on the proposed modification. Winifred Steams, 5 Dorrance Place said in this day when everybody is for sale, she would be very happy to see donors remain anonymous. She would vote yes on this amendment. Nory Snell asked if gifts from individuals or foundations could be acknowledged. Chairman Walsh said that the amendment reads "so long as there is no endorsement or advertising of commercial entities or products resulting". It is his understanding that gifts from individuals or foundations could still be acknowledged. In the event that the gift was from an entity or person seeking endorsement or advertising for commercial purposes, the gift could not be accepted." Martha Cassidy of Low Road said that there should not be a plaque on a bookcase that says "Coca Cola", but if a company sees fit to give a bunch of money to the library, it would be a sad day when we couldn't write them a letter of acknowledgement saying that an addition or repair was done through the generosity of that company. She said that an addition shouldn't be named for them, but they should at least receive a thank-you. She asked if that could be done the way this modification is written. Moderator Black said the wording says "commercial entities". Moderator Black asked Ms. Fanning if she would like to speak to this. Ms. Fanning said she would like to see individuals acknowledged and she would not like to see the Library prevented from accepting money from Coca Cola. What she would not like to see is Coca Cola plastered all over everywhere or even a small plaque left there permanently. She would be happy to defer the wording to someone who can do it better. Chairman Walsh suggested that Ms. Fanning withdraw her motion and that we have a process where the elected Trustees have a meeting where they develop a policy and bring that forth to the Selectboard for a public hearing to bless that policy. Tom Jacobs said as a Trustee, he would not like to have names plastered all over the Library. He feels that the Trustees should be allowed to handle this and the original motion to approve the article stand the way it is. Margaret Fanning MOVED and was SECONDED to withdraw her request to amend the wording of Article Twenty-Four to add the phrase "so long as there is no endorsement or advertising of commercial entities or products resulting". Moderator Black reverted to Chairman Walsh's original motion to approve Article Twenty-Four as written in the warrant. She asked if there was any further discussion on this motion. There being no further discussion, a voice vote was taken on Selectman Walsh's motion to approve Article Twenty-Four as written. The motion PASSED and Article Twenty-Four was ADOPTED.

Hanover Annual Report, 2005

  • Selectmen's letter: The "new" Howe Library is a reality. This is a tribute to many, many people, particularly the outstanding staff at the Library, the Board of Trustees, and the Construction Committee. It was not an easy task to raise the needed funds, $5.5 million, but it was accomplished by hard work and the generosity of people from the Upper Valley and beyond. The last $250,000 to be raised was the prestigious Kresge Foundation's challenge. Construction plans were predicated on the premise that the library would remain open during construction. The intent was to build the new wing first, move library operations into new space, and proceed to renovate the old building. This idea changed in the months after groundbreaking causing construction and library operations to occupy the same areas. Once areas were either completed or renovated, the wonderful design of the building became apparent. Architect Gerrit Zwart of Shepley Bullfinch, Richardson, and Abbott listened carefully to our needs and responded with a beautiful building. The "new" Howe is open, airy, and most comfortable. The interior design was planned in subtle colors to showcase the books and their myriad colors. We are particularly pleased with the new, much larger, Children's Area, Teen Area, Ledyard Art Gallery, and, especially, more collection space to respond to our users' needs. After nine years of planning and construction, the gala opening was held on October 23, 2005 and attended by over 1 ,700 people. Everyone had much to celebrate and many to thank. Howe Library is a community treasure; it exemplifies the unique partnership between the Town of Hanover and the Howe Library Corporation.

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library, commonly referred to as Etna Library, celebrated its one hundredth birthday through a year of celebratory events from Fall 2004 through Summer 2005. Centennial activities were planned and carried out by Etna Library's Centennial Committee members: Chris Bentivoglio, Paula Berg, Rhonda Siegel and Beth Vesley-Gross. The committee, with assistance from Laura Scanlan Beliveau, spent many hours of work over two years to prepare a full range of Centennial events. The committee produced a Town of Hanover Calendar celebrating the library's one hundred years, a commemorative painting by Brian Walsh, a Hanover Town Library Logo by Yusun Kwon, bookmarks by Mimi Murray-Eastman, an extended Mud Season Reading Program with visits from local authors, and a fund-raising Thanksgiving pie sale that promises to become an annual event. The centennial celebration culminated in a Centennial Birthday Party in September 2005. The committee is continuing Etna Library's Centennial Celebration through several ongoing activities. The public is invited to visit anytime during library hours for a treasure hunt that highlights the Hanover Town Library building as a historic landmark. A slide presentation on the public computer includes the library's initial location over "Charlie's Store", the library blueprint drawn by Robert Fletcher and portraits of early librarians. A traveling exhibit of the history of the Hanover Town Library is being displayed in locations around the Upper Valley. In its centennial year, the library has continued to follow the goals of its mission statement: "The Hanover Town Library will be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building." The collection of 7,970 items includes materials for adults, young adults, and children. In addition, a rotating collection of videos and recorded books is provided through the library's participation in the Librarians of the Upper Valley Cooperative. A public computer provides Internet access to patrons. All of the library's materials are included on KnowHowe, the online catalog of the Howe Library. A courier service allows patrons to place a reserve on an item at either Howe or Etna Library and to choose where they would like to pick it up. This year, the Etna Library has added a home delivery service staffed by volunteers. The library provides delivery of books and other materials to those who are permanently or temporarily unable to get to the library. The Etna Library has increased its hours so that it is open earlier on two mornings and later on Friday afternoon. New library hours are Monday from 2 to 7, Tuesday from 9 to 2, Thursday from 2 to 7, Friday from 9 to 4 and Saturday from 10 to noon. Directions, library hours and programs at the Etna Library are publicized on its webpage (www.hanovernh.org/etnalibrary). Adult library programs include a monthly book group that reads a variety of classic and contemporary books. In keeping with the centennial celebration, the annual Mud Season Reading Program included a number of local author programs. The library was visited by Sidney Finkelstein (Why Smart Executives Fail and What You Can Learn From Their Mistakes), Becky Kohn (The Guilded Chamber: A Novel of Queen Esther), Audrey McCollum (The Chronically III Child, Trauma of Moving, Two Women, Two Worlds: Friendship Swept by Winds of Change), Peter Krass (Carnegie and Blood & Whiskey: The Life and Times of Jack Daniel), Lori Berkencamp (Baffled Parents Guides, Fern House: A Year in an Artist 's Garden, Great Civil War Crafts You Can Build Yourself) and Scott Brown (How To Negotiate With Your Kids Even When You Think You Shouldn't). Two weekly programs for young children are held at the Etna Library. Children under three years are introduced to books, rhymes and crafts in Hands on Books on Fridays at 9:30. Children from three to six years old participate in Stories and Art on Tuesdays at 10:30. Additional programs for children of all ages included a Valentines and Halloween crafts parties. During the summer of 2005, Etna Library presented a series of Community Picnics for patrons of all ages. The season began with the annual Community Picnic/Book Sale. Additional picnics included programs by farmer and crafter Lise Richardson, author Willem Lange, blacksmithartist Ron Farr, author Sarah Masters Buckey and firefighter Tim Bent. In addition, Stories and Art for the Whole Family, a program of books and crafts, was presented weekly throughout the summer. The Hanover Town Library thanks Janet Block, Jane Buskey and Patricia Clinton for the opportunity to display their beautiful quilts. The library is privileged to be able to share their beautiful work with the community. The library is fortunate to receive ongoing support from a dedicated group of volunteers. Volunteers continue to staff the library on Saturday mornings. They run the Mud Season Reading Program, the annual June book sale and the summer community picnic series. In addition, the Etna Library volunteers, in conjunction with the Etna Ladies Aid, are responsible for the very successful annual Thanksgiving Pic Sale. Particularly exciting were the contributions to the library's centennial made by children and young adults. Their efforts produced the Etna Library Quest as well as activities that highlighted the library at its centennial birthday party. Their creative talents contributed greatly to the Hanover Town Library's celebration of its one hundredth birthday.

  • Etna Library Trustee report: The Hanover Town Library, known locally as the Etna Library, has been an important part of life in Etna Village for over a century. In 1899, the Etna Library and Debating Society merged its books with one hundred dollars' worth of books donated by the State of New Hampshire and began lending the books from Hayes Hall. The library building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was built in 1905. The Trustees of the Hanover Town Library are elected for three-year terms by the Hanover voters to oversee the library. Mission Statement: The Hanover Library will be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building. Activities: The Board of Trustees oversaw the operations of the Etna Library, which experienced another year of growth in patron visits, programs offered, and circulation of materials. We were thrilled with our centennial year. The Centennial Committee did a wonderful job with a vast array of programs and commemorative projects. These culminated with a well attended celebration at the library in September featuring games, prizes, music, a scrumptious cake, and the unveiling of Brian Walsh's beautiful painting of the library. The exciting spirit of our celebration continued with the Centennial Committee's sale of 75 homemade pies for Thanksgiving, which were baked with love by friends and supporters of the Etna Library. Finally, heavy-duty tote bags with our fabulous new logo were ordered and can be seen carrying books and groceries around town. They are available at the library for $8.

  • Howe Library report: I hope you have all had the opportunity to share the excitement of the "new" Howe Library. It is all we dreamed about and much more. We revel in the light and openness of the public areas and delight in the way users flow through the building. The Children's Area, designed to be an important part of the building, is teeming with parents, caregivers and little ones. Programs are so popular we have already added more. The Teen Area is packed full (25—40) after school. Collections now have space to be displayed and increased. The Ledyard Gallery continues to be a wonderful venue for local artists to display their work and enjoy sharing it with others at a reception in the same area. The cafe is proving to be a welcome spot for all ages who wish to have a snack, buy a book, or check email. The staff has lovely office space and an attractive lounge. The meeting rooms are refurbished and busier than ever. All involved hoped for a "WOW" response which is just what is being heard! The building is the result of many, many people including the Capital Campaign Committee and Construction Committee who enabled this treasure to be given to the community as a gift from the Trustees. A special thanks to Joan (Posey) Fowler, Dick Winters, Ralph Manuel, Jane Kitchel McLaughlin, Steve Marion, Mado Macdonald, Gerrit Zwart, Rick Nothnagel and Jere Nelson. We thank the entire community for generously opening their hearts to the opportunity to support this project. I give my sincere thanks to our patient users during the construction process. It has been noisy, dirty, cold/hot to the extreme. Collections moved no less than ten times (ask the volunteers!). We were fortunate to close for only a few days, but any closures are inconvenient to users. We appreciate the public's understanding and patience. As the director of this special library, I am honored to have been with Howe during this important part of its history. My hope is that this building will serve the community well for many, many years and for future generations.

  • Youth Services: Denise Reitsma Teens and children of all ages, along with their parents, grandparents, teachers, and the Youth Services staff are appreciative of the wonderful new space we have. The design works well - teens and children can feel comfortable in their own space - separate, but still part of the library. It has been exciting to see the teen room well-used, especially after school, and families enjoying the collection, program room, and the new aquarium in the children's room. Youth Services staff has increased hours and we can now fully staff our information desk as well as offer more programs. We present 6 story times every week and have regular after school programs for elementary students. We have offered several special programs over the year in conjunction with the Hood Museum and the Hanover Recreation Department. We are working on expanding the teen collection now that we have the space. In the future we will be adding new programs for all ages, particularly for middle schoolers.

  • Technical Services: Pamela Smith The Technical Services Department has been closely involved with planning for the new building. Working with the MIS department we have planned for the technology expansion and the communications wiring in the new building. Technical Services has been operating temporarily in the Murray Room since construction began last April. We added over 5,000 new items to the Howe and Etna collections this past year. Technical Services also performed a major upgrade to our Millennium system which added a number of significant enhancements.

  • Adult Information Services and Collections: Mary Hardy Here is a big, heartfelt thank you to the many wonderful volunteers, staff and other Town employees who worked many long hours to move our book and audio-visual collections to their new locations in our beautiful new library. Everything is now in its proper place and people are getting used to finding fiction on the first floor, nonfiction in the new lower level and DVDs, audio books and music in the new loft area. Books on a variety of themes are now featured in "Top Shelf Suggestions", a series of displays that are located just opposite the circulation desk. Book Letters is a new service for our readers of all ages. They are found on our web page ( www.thehowe.org) where people may also sign up to receive them in their email.

  • Circulation: Kristina Burnett Our new circulation area is spacious, beautiful, and functional - a tribute to the staff who designed it with much enthusiasm and care. We now have room for the dozens of books we keep on the holds shelf for patrons. We have four full computer work stations, including a station designed for children and people with mobility handicaps. We have a workable paging area and adequate staff work space behind the circulation desk. We also have a new self check out station. We knew going into this year that circulation numbers would suffer, but we haven't done too badly. Now that we are fully functional and parking is again available, we look forward to a steady increase in circulation and general use of this wonderful institution.

  • Public Relations/Programs: Ellen Lynch During the construction, programs were held in the library's periodical room, the RW Black Community Center and at Kendal. In the fall of 2005, programs were resumed in Howe's meeting rooms following the completion of the renovation and expansion project. In May a new monthly e-mail events calendar and newsletter was initiated. Talks by local authors included Christopher Wren, Ben Kilham, King Arthur Flour's B.J. Hamel, Mary Childers, Cyndy Bittinger, Peter Whybrow, and Henry Homeyer. Poet, novelist and biographer, Jay Parini read from his latest book of poetry at a program jointly sponsored by Kendal at Hanover. Telling Their Stories: New Hampshire Holocaust Survivors Speak Out, a fdm and discussion attracted a large audience. Rural Studios, a documentary fdm and discussion, drew an audience interested in sustainable architecture and low cost housing. Book discussions included The Non-Fiction Novel and the Fiction of History, Contemporary New England Voices and a new series initiated by Howe and funded by the NH Humanities Council titled Against All Odds: Survival of the Human Spirit with humanities scholar Suzanne Brown of Dartmouth. Volunteers Nita Choukas and Joan Snell organized the play reading series. Bruce Posner's Cine Salon fdm series presented unusual and rare fdms including a premier showing of the DVD collection: Unseen Cinema: Early American Avant-Garde Film 1894-1941. This DVD collection received a rave review from Dave Kehr, NY Times fdm critic. The monthly art exhibits resumed in the fall in the beautiful new Ledyard Gallery with an outstanding show highlighting a representative sampling of the many artists who had exhibited at Howe in the past.

  • Howe Library Trustee report: Development Program: • Annual Fund Drive: Jane Kitchel McLaughlin is chairing this effort, which continues to June 30, 2006. The proceeds from Fund 2005 are being used to supplement collections/programming for the Library. The Annual Fund will continue to be critical to Howe's finances. The USDA loan will need to be repaid and programs that are integral to Howe's service need to be financed. The Annual Fund will be the opportunity to make that happen. • Capital Campaign: Co-Chairs Ralph Manuel and Joan Fowler completed a most successful campaign reaching the goal of $5.5 million. It was a monumental effort by the co-chairs and committee members, especially former Trustee Chair, Dick Winters and Jane Kitchel McLaughlin. The community responded and enabled the "new" Howe Library to become a reality. • Planned Giving: The Trustees are hopeful, that as in the past, generous donors will step forward to indicate support for Howe in the future through their bequests. Facilities/Construction: Steve Marion has chaired this committee in one form or another since 1996. That is how long it took us to plan and build the "new" Howe Library. Nothing could have been accomplished without the blessing of the Hanover Selectboard and the necessary funds. After a May 2004 groundbreaking and some complications in the initial building phase, construction was completed in the Fall with a Grand Opening attended by over 1700 friends. Trumbull-Nelson, our construction management firm, and Gerrit Zwart, our architect from Shepley, Bullfinch, Richardson and Abbott are responsible for creating the wonderful building we now have. The Construction Committee, which met monthly, included Chair, Steve Marion; Gerrit Zwart; Clerk of the Works, Stephen Wheelock; the USDA representative, Gregg MacPherson; Chair of the Trustees, Joan Fowler; Project Manager from T-N, Todd Thompson; Trustee, Rick Nothnagel; Treasurer, Mado Macdonald; Library Director, Marlene McGonigle. Finance: Edward T. Kerrigan, Chair. The Committee meets quarterly with the investment advisors to review the portfolio. The Committee recently revised the investment policy with the approval of the Trustees. Governance: Bill Hamilton, Chair. There were no major updates to the By-Laws in 2005. The Committee fulfilled responsibilities to nominate the officers of the Board of Trustees. Non-resident Fees Committee: Ann Bradley, Chair. The Committee met in January to review non-resident fees and made a recommendation to the Selectboard to leave the fees as they are for Town of Hanover library cards.

Newspaper photograph of Bob Keene reading a book to children at the Etna Library.

Hanover Annual Report, 2006

  • We are very grateful to Dr. Bob Keene, who generously volunteered his time to build much needed shelving for the Etna Library. The shelves, made of hardwood donated by Bob, are beautiful additions to the historic Hanover Town Library building. The warm color and intricate trim match that of the original shelves built in 1905. Bob is shown reading Henry Builds a Cabin by D.B. Johnson to an enthusiastic preschool story time audience. - Etna Library Trustees and Staff

  • Selectmen's letter: In 2006, Howe staff and patrons happily settled into the new and improved Howe Library. Patrons discovered the wonderful rotating art shows in the new Ledyard Art Gallery, the quiet nooks and crannies throughout the building designed for quiet reading and contemplation, and all of the new collection space. Teens discovered their own Teen Area and the Cafe, and continue to make heavy use of the building after school each weekday. Children celebrated the greatly expanded Children's Area and the adjacent Children's Program room, as Howe staff worked to expand the offerings for our younger set. In February of 2007, Marlene McGonigle announced her retirement as Howe Library Director at the end of June, 2007 after 12 years. Having presided over the successful expansion and renovation of the Howe Library and steered the incredible re-invention of Howe Library services as a result of technology enhancements and the internet revolution, Marlene looks forward to having more time for family and for travel as she hands the reins over to the next Director. The search for her successor will, with luck, conclude just as we come together for Town Meeting on May 8 l and we look forward to celebrating retirement with Marlene in late June.

  • Those individuals we lost:  Wayne Broehl was a tireless supporter of the Howe Library. Professor Emeritus at The Tuck School, Dartmouth College and the author of many books, was known at Kendal as "Mr. Howe Library" for good reason. He championed Howe Library beginning with his time as a Trustee from 1 995 and extending to writing the Postscript in Emily's Legacy, Howe Library's First Century in 2003. During his time on the Board, he co-chaired the Development Program and Centennial Celebration in 2000. Wayne was honored by his family with a "Townscapes Fantasy" Mural in the lower lobby given in his memory.

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library, commonly referred to as the Etna Library, continues to follow its mission to "be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building". The library holds a permanent collection of approximately 8,200 items. In addition, a rotating collection of videos and recorded books is provided through the library's participation in the Librarians of the Upper Valley Cooperative. All of the library's materials are included on KnowHowe, the online catalog of the Howe Library. A courier service allows patrons to place a reserve on an item at either Howe or Etna Library and to choose where they would like to pick it up. A public computer provides Internet access to patrons. The library's collection has recently been extended through membership in the New Hampshire Downloadable Audio Books program. Through this program, recorded books can be downloaded toa computer or MP3 player. A variety of titles for adults and children can be downloaded at Howe Library, Etna Library or your home computer. New shelving by Dr. Robert (Bob) Keene has provided space for more materials while embellishing the historic beauty of the building. Dr. Keene has donated his woodworking skills to produce beautifully crafted shelves that match the hazel wood color and elaborate trim of the shelves that line the library walls. A traveling exhibit of the history of the Hanover Town Library, developed by the Centennial Committee, has been displayed in locations around the Upper Valley including the Hanover Recreation Department, the Etna Post Office, and Howe Library. The exhibit displays the history of the library in photos and text from the time of its opening in 1905. Directions, library hours and programs at the Etna Library are publicized on its webpage(www.hanovernh.org/etnalibrary). Adult library programs include a monthly book group that reads classic and contemporary books. As a finale to its 2006 Mud Season Reading Program for adults, the library presented John T.B. Mudge, author of The White Mountains: Names, Places and Legends and The Old Man 's Reader: History and Legends of Franconia Notch. In September, Nardi Reeder Campion addressed an enthusiastic audience with memories related to her 2006 book Over the Hill You Pick Up Speed: Reflections on Aging (For Anyone Who Happens To). Children's programs included story times for preschoolers, seasonal events for school-age children and the summer reading program. Stories and Art for young children is held twice a week at the Etna Library - Tuesday and Friday mornings at 10. Additional programs for children of all ages included Halloween, Holiday Decorations and Valentines crafts parties. During the summer of 2006, Etna Library presented a series of Community Picnics for patrons of all ages. The season began with the annual Community Picnic/Book Sale. Additional picnics presented entertainer Doug Coughlin with puppetry and juggling, geologist Lorin Durand with New Hampshire rocks and volcanoes, author Anne Sibley O'Brien on her book The Legend of Hong KilDong, librarian/artist Nilda Gomez with a Listen and Draw Program, storyteller Simon Brooks, author Lori Berkenkamp with her book Amazing Leonardo Da Vinci Inventions You Can Build Yourself John Stadler with his book Take Me Out To the Ball Game and state trooper Matt Koehler with his K-9 partner. In addition, Stories and Art for the Whole Family, a program of books and crafts, was presented weekly throughout the summer. The changing display of beautiful quilts and rugs continues to be popular. This year, patrons have very much appreciated viewing the artistry of Geraldine North, Janet Block, Jane Busky, Patricia Clinton and Frances Baschnagel. It is important to recognize the contributions of volunteers to Etna Library services and activities. Volunteers staff the library on Saturday mornings, provide delivery of books to the homebound and run the annual June book sale. In coordination with the Etna Ladies Aid, the Etna Library volunteers bake pies for the highly successful annual Thanksgiving Pie Sale. Library hours are Monday from 2 to 7, Tuesday from 9 to 2, Thursday from 2 to 7, Friday from 9 to 4 and Saturday from 10 to noon. For more information, please call the library at 643-3 1 16 or e-mail etna.library@hanovernh.org.

  • Etna Library Trustee report: The Hanover Town Library, known locally as the Etna Library, has been an important part of life in Etna Village for over a century. In 1 899, the Etna Library and Debating Society merged its books with one hundred dollars' worth of books donated by the State of New Hampshire and began lending the books from Hayes Hall. The library building, which is listed on the National Historic Register of Historic Places, was built in 1905. The Trustees of the Hanover Town Library are elected for three-year terms by the Hanover voters to oversee the library. Mission Statement: The Hanover Library will be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building. Activities: The Board of Trustees oversaw the operations of the Etna Library, which experienced another year of growth in patron visits, programs offered, and circulation of materials. The Trustees are proud to offer for the first time to its patrons, accessibility to download audio books from a large list of titles set up by the NH State Library. This can be done on-line from the library or from home on their own PC. Patrons who visit the library continue to be awed by the hanging quilt display. The quilts are handmade by friends of the library and are rotated monthly and/or seasonally. The library has continued its tradition of summertime picnics followed by an exciting array of programs presented by local Etna folks and other Upper Valley residents. Over the years, this unique program has proven to be a real crowd pleaser and we look forward to its continuation in the summer of 2007. Most appreciated however, is Bob Keene, a friend of the library who has so generously volunteered his time and donated beautiful hardwood in order to build much needed additional shelving in our library. Bob carefully crafted the shelving, duplicating the exact details of the original shelves built in 1905. Our heartfelt thanks go out to Bob for providing us with the extra room to hold more "treasures" in our little library on the hill!

  • Howe Library report: We continue to be thrilled with a spacious, beautiful expanded and renovated "new" Howe Library. Our usage numbers and circulation statistics continue to rise indicating the public is pleased with the wonderful gift given the community by the Howe Library Corporation and hundreds of donors. Considering that physical access to Howe throughout the year has been an everyday challenge, our increased statistics are somewhat amazing. Unfortunately, we need to get used to this situation since it will be with us for phase two of the South Block project as well as the entire Sargent Block plan that will follow. We only hope that our devoted users continue our upward trend for usage! Air conditioning has provided a welcome sanctuary all summer. Patrons are expressing delight with the wireless network that permits them to bring in laptops for their use or to use one of Howe's six available for loan. Our children's programs continue to take advantage of our creative staff and have expanded to meet the demand. Adult programming featured well known area authors as well as interesting books discussions. The meeting room usage grows as non-profit groups in the Upper Valley realize the three rooms are available free of charge. New services included a summer reading program for adults, a BLT (Books and Lunch on Tuesdays) monthly program, additional children's programming, and Express Checkout for the convenience of users who do not wish to wait in line to check out materials. The after school group of mostly middle school-aged children has come back in record numbers. They seem pleased with the Teen Area although their numbers dictate that they be all over the library. Their greatest need is for socializing time although we find many are studying or working in small groups. Sheer numbers create the need for supervision. As always our goal is to have the library welcome everyone. A Strawberry Social was held in June to honor the many volunteers who make Howe happen! We continue to value the more than 100 volunteers who help us. The year held a street name change for us: East South Street is now South Street which simplifies directions. Our staff remained the same with the addition of one substitute at the circulation desk: Liana Potieger. The success of Howe Library is a direct result of the high level of cooperation between the Town of Hanover and the Howe Library Corporation.

  • Howe Library Trustee report: Development Program: • Annual Fund Drive: Annette Williams chaired this effort which reached and exceeded its goal of $70,000. The proceeds from the Annual Fund drives are being used to supplement collections/programming for the Library so that the interest from the Library Endowments 109 can be used to repay the USDA loan pf $1 .8 million. A successful Annual Fund is critical for the financial well being of Howe Library. • Planned Giving: Two new plaques have been installed over the public access computers in the center of the Library to recognize past and future donors of Endowed Funds and Emily's Legacy Donors for bequests. The Trustees are hopeful, that as in the past, generous donors will step forward to indicate support for Howe in the future through their names fund and bequests. Facilities Maintenance Committee consists of Rick Nothnagel, Jay Pierson, and Devinder Sodhi who are charged with reviewing the Town Properties portion of the Town with Frank Austin from Public Works to insure that the "new" Howe Library's maintenance budget is funded as needed. Finance: William Dietrich, Chair, 2007; Ed Kerrigan, Chair, 2006. The Committee meets quarterly with the investment advisors to review the portfolio. Governance: Ralph Manuel, Chair. Updates to the By-Laws in 2006 included changes to correct the imbalance created by the wording of Trustee vacancy terms and continuity for the position of Treasurer. The Committee fulfilled responsibilities to nominate the officers of the Board of Trustees. Long Range Plan: Linda Dacey and Ellen Lynch co-chaired the committee that began work early in 2006 and will complete its work in the Spring of 2007. Much research in the form of surveys and focus groups gave the committee information needed to revise the mission statement and plan the objectives for the new strategic plan. Non-resident Fees Committee: Ann Bradley, Chair. The Committee meet each January to review non-resident fees and to make a recommendation to the Select Board for the fees changed for non-residents for the Town of Hanover library cards. In 2006, the recommendation was to leave the fee at $100/family.

Hanover Annual Report, 2007

  • Selectmen's letter: : Upon the retirement of Marlene McGonigle as Howe Library Director at the end of June, 2007 the position was assumed by Mary H. White. Mary came to us from the position of Director of the Rice-Aron Library at Marlboro College in Vermont. Howe staff and patrons continue to enjoy and discover new delights in the newly enlarged and improved Howe Library as well as the re-invention of Howe Library services as a result of technology enhancements and the internet revolution. The Selectmen endorsed the library's newly created ten-year strategic plan.

  • Etna Library report: The Hanover Town Library, commonly referred to as the Etna Library, continues to follow its mission to "be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building". The library holds a permanent collection of approximately 8,200 items. In addition, a rotating collection of videos and recorded books is provided through the library's participation in the Librarians of the Upper Valley Cooperative. All of the library's materials are included on KnowHowe, the online catalog of the Howe Library. A courier service allows patrons to place a reserve on an item at either Howe or Etna Library and to choose where they would like to pick it up. A public computer provides Internet access to patrons. Wireless internet access was added to the library this year. More and more people have been downloading books through the New Hampshire Downloadable Audio Books program. A variety of titles for adults and children can be downloaded at Howe Library, Etna Library or your home computer. To encourage people to try this new service, the Etna Library has one MP3 player available for check-out. Directions, library hours and programs at the Etna Library are publicized on its webpage (www.hanovemh.org/etnalibrarv). Adult library programs include a monthly book group that reads classic and contemporary books. As a finale to its 2007 Mud Season Reading Program for adults, the library presented Mary Childers, author of Welfare Brat: a Memoir. Children's programs included story times for preschoolers, seasonal events for school-age children and the summer reading program. Stories and Art for young children is held twice a week at the Etna Library - Tuesday and Friday mornings at 10. Additional programs for children of all ages included Halloween, Winter Holiday, Valentines and Lunar New Year craft parties. During the summer of 2007, Etna Library presented a series of Community Picnics for patrons of all ages. The season began with the annual Community Picnic/Book Sale. Additional picnics presented author Dean Whitlock, artist Nilda Gomez, author Linda Michelin, illustrator D.B. Johnson, "Poetry Guy" Ted Scheu, and Geraldine North showing children how to rug hook pictures of animals. Stories and Art for the Whole Family, a program of books and crafts for children of all ages, was presented weekly throughout the summer. The contributions of volunteers are vital to ongoing Etna Library services and activities. Volunteers staff the library on Saturday mornings, provide delivery of books between Howe and Etna Libraries and run the annual June book sale. We are thankful to the Etna Ladies Aid and the Etna Library volunteers for the numerous pies they bake for the highly successful annual Thanksgiving Pie Sale. Library hours are Monday from 2 to 7, Tuesday from 9 to 2, Thursday from 2 to 7, Friday from 9 to 4 and Saturday from 10 to noon. For more information, please call the library at 643-3116 or e-mail etna.library@hanovernh.org.

  • Etna Library Trustee report: The Hanover Town Library, know locally as the Etna Library, has been an important part of life in Etna Village for over a century. In 1899 the Etna Library and Debating Society merged its books with one hundred dollars' worth of books donated by the State of New Hampshire and began lending the books from Hayes Hall. The library building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was built in 1905. The Trustees of the Hanover Town Library are elected for three-year terms by the Hanover voters to oversee the library. The trustees meet the first Monday of each month at 1 :45 p.m. in the library. (No meeting in July.) Mission Statement: The Hanover Town Library will be an active presence in the village, providing its services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building. Activities: The Board of Trustees oversaw the operations of the Etna Library, which experienced another year of growth in patron visits, programs offered, and circulation of materials. The trustees decided to continue offering to Etna Library patrons the opportunity to download audio books through the NH State Library Program. Many titles for both children and adults can be downloaded at the Etna Library, Howe Library or on personal computers. In addition to having one MP3 available for check-out at the library, the names of people who complete a short survey will be put into a drawing for winning their own MPS player. The Etna Library Trustees greatly appreciate all the volunteers who contribute to our library in many, many ways - staffing the library on Saturday mornings, baking yummy pies for the Thanksgiving sale, purchasing beautiftjl new books for the library during Love My Library month, and organizing the June book sale, to name a few. We are also most fortunate to have two very competent and welcoming staff people who create a warm friendly atmosphere along with excellent service to patrons both young and old - Barbara Prince, Librarian and Mary King, Assistant Librarian.

  • Howe Library report: The year 2007 commenced with celebration when the Howe Library was awarded special mention as one of the Best Small Libraries in America by Library Journal and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. It is an honor to receive this important recognition and we continue to be cognizant that the strong support of Hanover residents and the Howe Library Corporation are vital for our success. In June 2007 the Selectmen endorsed the library's newly created ten-year strategic plan which outlined four areas of strategic opportunity: • expanding Howe's role as a community gathering place • promoting the library as a center for the development of young readers and for lifelong learning for all ages • developing a plan to better advertise our services and need for ongoing financial support • exploring Howe's role in relationship to other libraries in the region The full strategic plan may be viewed from the library's home page and also at: http://www.thehowe.org/LRP-07.pdf In August 2007 the Howe Library received a $10,000 donation from the Sunup Foundation in memory of Joy Lange Boardman, a long-time library volunteer. These funds are designated primarily for audio books as well as some new print books. More than 80 unabridged audio books have been added to this popular collection. September brought the return of many teens visiting after school. Although these students are generally well behaved, their energy and numbers, combined with the building's open architecture, can prove disruptive between the hours of 3:00 and 6:00. Efforts have been made to better publicize the quiet study areas for those who wish to not be disturbed. We were fortunate to receive an anonymous one-year donation for an after-school teen supervisor and this additional staffing is helping to develop a positive relationship with this age group. One of the goals of our strategic plan was to redesign the library's website and the latter half of 2007 was spent exploring numerous web developers and interviewing four. The trustees have approved hiring our top selection and we expect to unveil a new web site in spring 2008. The Howe Library Corporation will be financing this special project. Library statistics continued to climb, particularly meeting room use, in-house computer use, circulation, and access to the Howe's website. Detailed performance indicators are listed on the next page. Our wireless connectivity and in-house laptop services continue to be very popular and we are delighted to report that, due to patron demand, we will be offering Mac computers in 2008. Staffing changes include the retirement of library director Marlene McGonigle and the hiring of a new director, Mary H. White. Also hired was a part-time circulation assistant, Susan Leveret.

  • Howe Library Trustee report: The Board meets on the second Thursday of each month at 3:30 p.m., except during July and August. The Corporation's Annual Meeting is the second Thursday in October. Development Program 2007 : Annual Fund Drive: Annette Williams, chair. Proceeds from the Annual Fund are used to enhance the collections and to fund adult and children's programs, while the earnings from the Corporation's unrestricted endowment funds are needed to repay the $1.8 million USDA loan. The 2007 Annual Fund Drive raised $100,000, exceeding its goals by 10%. Planned Giving: The Howe Library Corporation has created "Emily's Legacy Society", named after Emily Howe whose bequest in 1900 established the library and whose vision assured that Howe would be "a blessing to this community to the remotest generation". The Trustees strongly encourage friends of Howe Library to establish named funds and bequests for future support of the library. Donors of bequests and named funds are displayed on plaques in the library. Committee Highlights 2007 : Facilities Maintenance Committee: Devinder Sodhi, chair. This committee is charged with reviewing, with Frank Austin fi-om Public Works, the Town properties portion of the Town budget to insure that the Howe's maintenance budget is funded as needed. This committee recently discussed the need to clear snow from all fire exits to sidewalks, repair of some older windows and the budget for future roof replacement for the 1975 building. Finance: Bill Dietrich, chair. This committee meets quarterly with the Corporation's investment advisors to review the portfolio. Long Range Plan: Linda Dacey and Assistant Director Ellen Lynch, co-chairs. A final document, consisting of four areas of strategic opportunity and 16 goals for the future, was approved by the Howe Library Board of Trustees in May 2007 and endorsed by the Town of Hanover Board of Selectmen in June 2007. Non-Resident Fees Committee: Ann Bradley, chair. This committee meets each January to review non-resident fees and to make a recommendation to the Selectmen for the fees charged to non-residents for the Town of Hanover library cards. In 2007 the recommendation was to increase the fee $10 to $110 for a family card.

  • Building Division report: New furnace installation at the Etna Library. • Interior painting of both the Etna Library and the Etna Fire Station.

  • Etna Library budget: $10,737; Howe Library budget: $128,237

Hanover Annual Report, 2008

Hanover Annual Report, 2009

Hanover Annual Report, 2010

  • Library highlights: "2010 was an important year in the history of the Etna Library. Numerous generous donations enabled the town to purchase the land surrounding the library from the heirs of Ethel Hayes. The trustees and staff are very grateful to the Hayes Land fund-raising committee and all the donors. Owning the land makes possible the construction of a parking area and a barrier-free entrance."

Hanover Annual Report, 2011

Hanover Annual Report, 2012-2013

Hanover Annual Report, 2013-2014

Hanover Annual Report, 2015-2016

Hanover Annual Report, 2016-2017

Hanover Annual Report, 2017-2018

Hanover Annual Report, 2018-2019

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